Thursday, May 21, 2015

Placeholder Post

Quickie post--I'll update this on Saturday, so you can check that YOUR range was correctly picked. I'm making a wedding cake this week, and it's a tad exhausting, so I'm keeping it simple in other sectors of my life.

The answers were Korean and Ukraine. I do like Koala Nigel, though. (Did I get that right?)

Sunday, May 17, 2015

Pick Yet ANOTHER Country, Any Country

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name a country with at least three consonants. These are the same consonants, in the same order, as in the name of a language spoken by millions of people worldwide. The country and the place where the language is principally spoken are in different parts of the globe. What country and what language are these?
It's Lilac Weekend, so Henry is visiting us. I'll set "the guys" to solving this one while I find some pretty pictures of lilacs to share. Solving is going to be challenging, as we have a few questions we can only assume the answer to. Oh, wait. No it isn't.

You have no such questions. You know the answer(s) already. What can I do to help? I know: here's the NPR Contact Us form.

Lilacs! (Not our own, simply because Ross hasn't taken photos of ours yet.)

lilacs

Lilac

lilacs revisited

Lilacs

Ginormous Lilac Bushes

White lilac


Time for



This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

Over 300 entries for the AIDES AIMED: ROUTE puzzle (those being the three single-syllable words the Puzzlemaster accepted). Jay is our winner, so let us know which prize you'd like to receive! We're back in the Pick a Country, Any Country puzzles, so I don't know--are those easier? Pick a range based on your guess, or by shooting a dart at the chart, your choice.

Here are the ranges:
Zero and fewer
  1 - 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.