Thursday, December 18, 2014

Ahoy = Sailor / Yahoo = Cowboy / ??? = Puzzler

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Think of a common exclamation in four letters. Move the last letter to the start, and then add a new letter to the end, to get another well-known exclamation. What is it?
Here's the answer Henry came up with: AHOY -> YAHO + O = YAHOO. Is that the "right" answer? I have no idea. It's what we've got.

While I'm thinking of it, Sunday's blog post may be delayed by a few hours. (Or I will have conned Ross into posting it for me.) I'm off on Friday to Blantyre, a small hotel in Lenox, Massachusetts, to celebrate a cousin's 50th birthday. I'll be home on Sunday, but who knows when.

Let's see what Flickr has for Lenox, shall we?













Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Zero and fewer
    1 - 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450 -- Joe Kupe
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750 -- legolambda
751 - 800 -- Ross
801 - 850 -- Margaret
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150 -- Jay
1,151 - 1,200 -- Magdalen
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Maggie Strasser
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050 -- Mendo Jim
2,051 - 2,100 -- Paul
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400 -- Curtis
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750 -- Word Woman
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Sunday, December 14, 2014

Inclinations Toward Exclamations

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Think of a common exclamation in four letters. Move the last letter to the start, and then add a new letter to the end, to get another well-known exclamation. What is it?
Even with three of us (Henry is here for Cookie Weekend) it took us a few minutes to get AN answer. (Is it THE answer? No clue.)

When you've got the answer, don't hint about it in the comments (what a waste!). Send it in to NPR using their Contact Us form, which has free shipping this week.

I'm writing this as I listen to the puzzle. The word "postcard" popped out at me. (Any of you go back to the postcard days? We don't. Henry and I started to listen to the puzzle in the late 90s.














Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

2040 entries for Sante Fe, New Mexico. Needless to say, no one won. Better luck this week!

Here are the ranges:
Zero and fewer
  1 - 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do..