Sunday, November 14, 2010

NPR Puzzle 11/14/10 -- Intonation, Anyone? Antoinette? Iain? Auntie?

Here's this week's puzzle:
What is the longest familiar phrase, title, or name in which the only consonants are N and T, repeated as often as necessary? The other letters are vowels.
Ross gets the bragging rights today.  There's not much I can tell you about how we solved this puzzle without skirting some hinty territory.  Oh, except to say that the words/names in this post's title have nothing to do with the answer.

If you figure out the answer, send it to NPR here.  Don't leave it -- or even hint to it -- in the comments.  Please.  (thank you)

Before I move onto Photo Time, I will confess to rampant narcissism.  I just assume that someone at NPR reads these posts.  For example, when Liane announced that they had 2,500 entries, I thought immediately that the pesky intern at NPR did that to me on purpose.  C'mon, dude (or dudette), really?  2,500 precisely?  I find that hard to believe.  You and I both know it was 2,506 or 2,498.  Stop messin' with me.

But the joke's on you, NPR Intern.  We have an official tie-break policy, to wit:
In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")
Of course it's in fine print.  I used to be a lawyer in my other life.

In this case, DAPF (aka David Andre Pierre Frenchman) is our winner.  Not only has he not won before, but he was the first to get in his answer.  I believe David has won before, but even if someone switched Davids on me, DAPF still gets the prize.  So, DAPF, send your snail-mail address to me at Magdalen (at) CrosswordMan.com and we'll get that prize out to you.

Photos!  I can't tell you what relationship these photos have with the answer -- all way too hinty -- so if you know the answer to the puzzle, you can try to puzzle out the connection.  (Actually, don't bother -- they're too obscure, really.  No one could be expected to know all of them, or even one or two.)  If you don't know the answer to this week's puzzle, they're just pretty pictures.  Enjoy!








Time for ...


P I C K   A   R A N G E

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.
Congratulations, again, to DAPF for his win last week.  Something tells me there won't be 2,500 +/- entries this week, but we'll see.

[As always, troublemakers risk winning the American Girl puzzle book, so play nice.  :-)]

Here are the ranges:

Fewer than 100
100 - 200
200 - 300
300 - 400
400 - 500

500 - 600
600 - 700
700 - 800
800 - 900
900 - 1,000

1,000 - 1,100
1,100 - 1,200
1,200 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,500

1,500 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,900
1,900 - 2,000

2,000 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,500

2,500 - 3,000

3,000 - 3,500

3,500 - 4,000

4,000 - 4,500

4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000

More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.

Our tie-break rule: 
In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

8 comments:

DAPF said...

I'll go back to my usual 700-800 range request for this week, please. Just an intuition...

Jordan said...

I'll take 1400-1500

Thanks

-Jordan

Marie said...

I'll take 800-900.

phredp said...

I'll go with 1000 - 1100 but think I'm way too optimistic!

Mendo Jim said...

I have a 17 and have spent enough time on this one.
Somebody on Blaine's has 37.
I wonder if I am going to kick myself or the P Master when I hear his answer.
900-1000: I used to think there was some rhyme or reason to the Range. Maybe that was back in the tranche days.

David said...

I have not come up with any reasonable answer. I'll go with the 600 to 700 range. And it was me who was a prior winner.

Dave said...

Not a fan of this week's puzzle. I'll nab the 1100 to 1200 slot.

Tom said...

I've not been able to come up with a reasonable solution to this weeks challenge, even after trying to solve it with TEA. I'll take 500-600 this week. (After the deadline I'll need to ask Ross if he used TEA to solve, and how.)