Thursday, January 13, 2011

NPR Puzzle 1/9/11 - Coats at Ascot

Here's this week's puzzle:
Name an article of apparel in the plural form, ending with an S. Rearrange the letters to name an article of apparel in the single form. What things to wear are these?
We came up with three sets of answers.  In ascending order of correctness, then:  SHOE & HOSE (clearly wrong because HOSE doesn't end in an S); VEILS & LEVIS (less obviously wrong, although would you consider Levis to be singular?); and the really correct answer: COATS & ASCOT.  This amused us because we had two reference works, both English, and "ascot" is not included in the laundry list of clothing in either book.

In England, Ascot is this:


and not this:


If you will allow "coats" to include the sorts of jackets that get worn at fancy occasions, here then are some coats at Ascot:


On the topic of last week's puzzle, the "Well Spotted" award goes to Mendo Jim, who commented on Sunday:
The first time The Puzzlemaster used the "ayes/a yes" challenge (August, 2005), he couched it in rigorous and unambiguous language.
That was a confused time in that Hurricane Katrina took the segment off the air. I think I may remember working on it from the website.
Obviously Will doesn't remember it, since he attributed the source that time and this to different contributors.
This time, his offering was neither rigorous nor unambiguous, allowing answers such as "sunsets" and "toothaches" to be just as correct as his desired one.
(Natasha also noted the duplication, so Well Spotted to her too.)  It does suggest that Will's memory is not flawless.  As I think he may be a year or three older than I am, I forgive all failures in recall, lest my own failures be criticized.  You can hear Will's announcement of the answer to the "Canceled by Katrina" puzzle here.

Time for ...

P I C K   A   R A N G E

Please note the new, improved, expanded, deliberately-less-easy-to-win, set of ranges! 
 
Again, we're very sorry that our rural Internet provider punked on us last Sunday, as that must surely have be a factor in the low number of Pick-a-Range entries we got.  Yes, we were looking to reduce the odds of having a winner, but not by failing to post in time.  Let's hope NPR and NEP both come through for us this weekend.

Here are the NEW ranges (and I've charged Ross with designing a less uh, lengthy display):

Fewer than 50
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500

500 - 550
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750
750 - 800
800 - 850
850 - 900 -- Dave
900 - 950
950 - 1,000 -- Jason

1,000 - 1,050 -- Ross
1,050 - 1,100
1,100 - 1,150
1,150 - 1,200
1,200 - 1,250
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450
1,450 - 1,500 -- Magdalen

1,500 - 1,550 -- DAPF
1,550 - 1,600 -- Marie
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000 -- David

2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350 -- Grace
2,350 - 2,400 -- Mendo Jim
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750
2,750- 3,000

3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500

3,500 - 4,000

4,000 - 4,500

4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000

More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.

Our tie-break rule: 
In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").

2 comments:

David said...

"Levis" is plural, because you would say, "My Levis are wet", not "My Levis is wet."

Paul said...

If "Levis" is plural, then "Dockers" is plural, so how does DOCKERS & RED SOCK register on the correctness meter?