Thursday, February 10, 2011

NPR Puzzle 2/6/11 - Mr. Moneybags

Here's this week's puzzle:
Name two things an airplane does. Each of these is a single word. Put them together, one after the other, to make a compound word that names something it's nice to have as big as possible. What is this thing?
Not too surprising that Will Shortz -- whose Sudoku franchise has made him a wealthy man, we hear -- came up with this puzzle.  The obvious answer is BANKROLL.

Time for some money:




Money laundering, of course
Latest news here is that Ross has agreed to do a very short (as in "don't sneeze or you'll miss it" short) explanation of the differences between British cryptic crosswords and American style cryptic crosswords at the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament.  Yes, I know all the crossword aficionados have left this blog already, but I'm proud of Ross and I want to show off.

This has resulted in a ping pong table tennis rally of emails between Ross & Will Shortz, two students of the history and development of crossword puzzles.  Ross has researched the genealogy of Arthur Wynne, the alleged father of the crossword -- he was born in England but emigrated to the U.S., so who gets to claim him?  Well, if it matters, it appears that he only naturalized as an American citizen after he created what is traditionally thought to be the first crossword puzzle.  But Will has his counter-arguments, so these two titans of the gridiron are duking it out, in a friendly way, of course.

Time for ...
P I C K   A   R A N G E

Fewer than 50       
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500

500 - 550
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750
750 - 800
800 - 850
850 - 900
900 - 950
950 - 1,000
1,000 - 1,050         
1,050 - 1,100
1,100 - 1,150
1,150 - 1,200
1,200 - 1,250
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450
1,450 - 1,500

1,500 - 1,550
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700 -- Ross
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800 -- David
1,800 - 1,850 -- Grace
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950 -- Tom
1,950 - 2,000 -- Marie
2,000 - 2,050 -- Magdalen
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150 -- Dave
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,450 -- Richard
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250 -- Mendo Jim
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000 -- Charles
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule: 
In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

1 comment:

Grace said...

This was quite easy puzzle. I did come up with a second answer LANDFALL
Think it qualifies.