Thursday, March 24, 2011

NPR Puzzle 3/20/11 -- A Puzzle with a Half-Life

Here's this week's puzzle:
Take the phrase "consumer protection laws," and rearrange the letters to name a person in broadcasting and an issue of public debate. Hints: The name of the person in broadcasting has five letters in the first name and five letters in the last name. For the issue of public debate, it's a familiar two-word phrase with seven letters in the first word and five letters in the second. What name and phrase are these?
Sometimes I think it would be fun to solve these sorts of puzzles the CORRECT (non cheating) way.  One day, I'll try it again.  But this would not have been the weekend to try it, what with the ACPT and all.

Anyway, the answers were SCOTT SIMON (Liane Hansen's Saturday counterpart and a serious cutie-pie) and NUCLEAR POWER.





Here are the photos I used:

For Scott Simon, I used his Wiki page for inspiration. According to that, he was born in Chicago, Illinois:


He and his wife Caroline got married in Ridgefield, Connecticut at the home of designer Alexander Julian.  I couldn't find a picture of Mr. Julian's home, so here's Ridgefield:


Simon wrote a novel, Pretty Birds, based on interviews he conducted with two young women snipers in Sarajevo.  Couldn't find a photo on Flickr of a sniper, but here's Sarajevo:


Now, for nuclear power, I selected three locations that have nuclear power plants.  First up, Crystal River, Florida:


Hanford, Washington:


Plymouth, Massachusetts:


Understand, I'm not against nuclear power -- I'm against underfunding nuclear power, and in particular
the safety measures of nuclear power plants.  But that's a debate for another sort of blog altogether.

Time for ...
P I C K   A   R A N G E

Fewer than 50       
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500

500 - 550
550 - 600 -- Ross
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750
750 - 800
800 - 850
850 - 900
900 - 950
950 - 1,000 -- Mendo Jim
1,000 - 1,050 -- Phil       
1,050 - 1,100
1,100 - 1,150 -- David
1,150 - 1,200
1,200 - 1,250
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450
1,450 - 1,500 -- Magdalen

1,500 - 1,550 -- Dave
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650 -- Grace
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000 -- Marie
2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule: 
In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

1 comment:

David said...

It's not "NUCULAR POWER"?