Thursday, April 21, 2011

NPR Puzzle 4/17/11 - 10SNE1?

Vanity Plates: What a Racket!

Here's this week's puzzle:
Think of a nine-letter word naming a venue for certain sports. Three letters in the word are repeated. Remove all the repetitions, and the remaining six letters can be rearranged to name a piece of sports equipment. What are these two words?
The answer is RACETRACK - RAC = RACETK = RACKET.

What we did was to mull this over, then look at some crossword reference books that have lists of stuff.  That actually didn't help us except that one book included a cross-reference to horse racing, and well -- the rest is history.

For the photos, I tried to find obscure places with Formula One racetracks:


Sakhir, Bahrain

Bremgarten, Germany

Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India

Shizuoka, Japan (with Mount Fuji)

Hockenheim, Germany

Yeongam Wangin Chrysanthemum Festival, South Korea

There was always a risk that someone would Google >Mount+Fuji+Sports+Venue< and watch that neat trick Google does of "guessing" what you're going to type next.  If you'd Googled >Mount+Fuji+S+P< you'd have seen Mount Fuji Speedway, which is a RACETRACK, and then I've given the game away.  But I liked the photo enough to take the risk.

Time for  ...
P I C K   A   R A N G E

I normally don't comment here on the Thursday post, but Ross and I have a little disagreement going on about the number of entries.  He figures this week's puzzle is harder than last week's, so there will be even fewer entries.  I figure that more people drove to church last Sunday (Palm Sunday), listened to the puzzle on the way, got just a wee bit bored in church so had lots of time to solve the puzzle and then sent it in.  Let's see who's right...

Fewer than 50       
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500

500 - 550
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750 -- Grace
750 - 800 -- Ross
800 - 850 -- Jimel
850 - 900
900 - 950
950 - 1,000 -- Dave
1,000 - 1,050 -- David  
1,050 - 1,100 -- Sarah86
1,100 - 1,150
1,150 - 1,200 -- Magdalen
1,200 - 1,250
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450
1,450 - 1,500

1,500 - 1,550
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000
2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750 -- Mendo Jim
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule: 

In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

I don't like that. The sports equipment is a racquet, not a racket.

Trick Barrett said...

Only in British English; in American English, both spellings are acceptable. Considering the puzzle's from NPR, I presume American English is being utilised.