Thursday, April 7, 2011

NPR Puzzle 4/3/11 - Telling Your Bedes

Crossword Man here, sitting in for Magdalen, who's unable to access the internet from her usual haunt when on the road. Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Assign every letter of the alphabet a numerical value: A=1, B=2, C=3 and so forth. Think of a classic work of literature that has eight letters in its title. When the letters are given a numerical value, they add up to 35. What's the title? Clue: The title has two words.
An eight-letter, two-word classic work of literature just has to be the Moby Dick, right?

Not this time. Adding the letters of Melville's monumental MO gives you a whopping 82, well above the target of 35. Clearly the title in question must largely use the low-value letters A thru E.

And with that in mind, it isn't too hard to think of Adam Bede ... George Eliot's first novel. Not one I've read, and if I saw the BBC adaptation in the 1990s, it left an indelible blank on my mind. But we did enjoy watching the later North and South serialization recently.

I suppose I'd better try and work out what all those pix have to do with the book. Ah yes, dusting off my old old copy of The Oxford Literary Guide to the British Isles revealed the likely originals of the fictional places in Adam Bede:

Ellastone was the model for the village of Hayslope in the novel

The inspiration for Adam Bede was a story told by George Eliot's auntie, who lived in Wirksworth (above)

Cobblestones in Wirksworth

Ashbourne was the model for Oakbourne in the novel

"Eagle Valley" in Adam Bede is thought to have been modeled on Dovedale (above)

Another image from Dovedale

Time for ...

P I C K   A   R A N G E

Fewer than 50       
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500

500 - 550
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750
750 - 800
800 - 850 -- Phil
850 - 900
900 - 950 -- Grace
950 - 1,000 -- David
1,000 - 1,050 -- Dave   
1,050 - 1,100 -- Henry
1,100 - 1,150 -- Lorenzo
1,150 - 1,200
1,200 - 1,250 -- Ross
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350 -- Mendo Jim
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450
1,450 - 1,500 -- Magdalen

1,500 - 1,550
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000 -- Marie
2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule: 

In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

2 comments:

Magdalen said...

Nice job, sweetheart! Thanks. (And boo hiss to Barnes & Noble for their unreliable WiFi but a hip hip hooray to Dunkin' Donuts in Quakertown for picking up the slack!)

The tunnel is in Ashborne: here it is in Flickr.

Uh, could I have 1450 - 1500 please? Thanks!

David said...

Answers to last weeks supplemental puzzles (those ending with question marks are my guesses of someone else's puzzle):

11/2/148: Barry Lyndon?

The non-US politician: Abba Eban.

Off a cliff: AAAAAAAA?

Someone asleep: ZZZZZZZZ?

Homer Simpson's response to Doh-nuts: MMMMMMMM.

Homer Simpson's alternate response: OOOOOOOO?

A mouse: EEEEEEEE?

A snake: SSSSSSSS?