Thursday, May 19, 2011

NPR Puzzle 5/15/11 -- Newt Nags Sumo to get a Grip on Ecru Typos

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Create a 4-by-4 crossword square with four four-letter words reading across and four different four-letter words reading down. Use the word "nags" at 1 across and the word "newt" at 1 down. All eight words must be common, uncapitalized words, and all 16 letters must be different.
As I was explaining on Sunday, Ross's software includes a product called Sympathy (companion to TEA, geddit?) that allows us to make crossword grids -- even easy-peasy ones like this:


Now, no one guessed which answers I didn't have photos for. The answer is, I didn't use photos for ECRU (2Ac) (too lacy and, frankly, boring) and SUMO (4Dn) (too obvious).  I was awfully pleased to find the following pictures, which really did seem unrelated to their words.  (Oh, and if you looked everything up on Flickr and that's how you knew which ones I didn't use, well, now that's no fun.)


Nags Head, North Carolina

Newt (the name of the cat, I assume) at window, looking out

Whim moss (a Whim site is a transition from a "lowland raised bog" and a "blanket bog" - and I have no idea what any of that means)

I believe the photographer thought this should read "Harry Knutsson" - hence a typo

NASA's Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes, or GRIP

Miyakomachi, Japan - and Richard West's own caption says it all: 

achy legs

1 hour up - 10 minutes down.

Okay, that was fun.

Time for  ...

P I C K   A   R A N G E

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50       
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450 -- Ross
450 - 500 -- Phil

500 - 550 -- Justin
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750 -- Trey
750 - 800 -- Magdalen
800 - 850 -- Dave
850 - 900 -- Deb
900 - 950 -- Jimel
950 - 1,000
1,000 - 1,050 -- David
1,050 - 1,100
1,100 - 1,150
1,150 - 1,200
1,200 - 1,250 -- Mendo Jim
1,250 - 1,300 -- Marv
1,300 - 1,350
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450
1,450 - 1,500

1,500 - 1,550
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000
2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

2 comments:

Mendo Jim said...

As I said in my post on this challenge, I was intrigued by the striped mountain road; it looked sort of like a long parking lot.
I thought I would find out more and Googling "miyakomanchi" seemed like a reasonable way to do so.
I tried to remember how to spell it and missed with "miyo" "miyaka" etc. and thought Google was just being picky when nothing came up.
When I finally got it sort of right, the only return was (drum roll, please) a picture from a page called something weird like Crosswordmanblog.com
I am not sure if this process has made me more or less interested in what the heck that road is all about.
(OK, that's once I clicked on "Post Comment")
(OK, that's twice I clicked on "Post Comment")

David said...

Last week, I found girl's names and boy's names by length. This week, I found a list of about 6,000 four letter words at http://www.scrabble.org.au/words/fours.htm (although I got the same answer as Magdalen before I looked at the list).

The word that reminded me of blood is "typo".