Thursday, July 28, 2011

NPR Puzzle 7/24/11 - 1,000 Origami Ukraines

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name the female of a certain animal, add the name of a bird, say these two words out loud one after the other, and phonetically you'll name a country. What country is it?
We got three answers, in order of ascending size (I was working through a list of countries):  SOW + MOA = SAMOA, which I agree doesn't work -- not because it's actually pronounced SAMoa, but because it's pronounced (where I come from) SUHmoa.  Ross rejected this one.  Oh, and moa is a pretty obscure bird, even among the extinct ones.

Next, EWE + GANDER = UGANDA.  Here's where the British treatment of an ultimate R sounds come in, but before we even got to that we had to share a laugh about Ross's brother, Michael, who's been donating his engineering expertise weeks at a time to help Ugandan villages have potable water.  Michael's accent is only a bit broader than Ross's, but when he goes to say "Uganda," it comes out "you-GAWN-dah" and is very funny.  Ross and I also discussed why "gander" - a male geese - would be acceptable given the way the puzzle is worded.  I rejected Uganda even though Ross was convinced it was right.

Luckily, the 7-letter countries came next, and EWE + CRANE = UKRAINE is so obviously the right answer there could be no more questions.  Even Ross conceded it was good I kept reading countries out loud.  Here are a sample of the oft-replenished 1,000 cranes at a memorial in Hiroshima, Japan:



Here are our three countries, in pictorial form:

Mount Elgon, Jinja, Uganda

Rainbow over Ukraine

Upolu Island, Samoa -- sadly, this is a spot where the tsunami hit in 2009

The Nile, Jinja, Uganda

Sunset in American Samoa

Krym, Ukraine
Time for --

P I C K   A   R A N G E
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500
 
500 - 550
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750
750 - 800
800 - 850
850 - 900
900 - 950
950 - 1,000 -- Mendo Jim
1,000 - 1,050 -- David
1,050 - 1,100 -- HenryBW
1,100 - 1,150 -- Natasha
1,150 - 1,200
1,200 - 1,250 -- woozy
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350
1,350 - 1,400 -- Magdalen
1,400 - 1,450 -- Dave
1,450 - 1,500

1,500 - 1,550 -- Ross
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850 -- skydiveboy
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000
2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400 -- Marie
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500


2,500 - 2,750
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

1 comment:

woozy said...

Sow-moa. *snicker* I thought maybe your third country was something like Mare-rocko or Doe-mynah-caw but I have to admit, Sow-moa never occurred to me.