Friday, September 16, 2011

NPR Puzzle 9/4/11 - Greetings from Scotland! (Naltoc Smorfs: G'nite Erg)

It's the palindrome game:

Here's this week's (and next: see below) NPR puzzle:
This is a special two-week creative challenge involving palindromes. A palindrome reads backwards and forward the same. Write a palindrome that contains the name of a famous person. For example: "No, Mel Gibson is a casino's big lemon." Or "Ed, I saw Harpo Marx ram Oprah W. aside." You can use the famous person's full name or just the last name, whatever you like. The object is to write the most interesting palindrome that contains a famous person's name, past or present. Any length is fine, short or long. Palindromes will be judged on their interest, elegance and naturalness of syntax.
Did y'all have fun doing this?  I won't lie and say I did -- I just assigned it as a computer programming challenge for Ross and his software.  In the end, he wrote one and fragments of half-a-dozen others.  I cobbled together a completely lame sentence (see that bit about "naturalness of syntax"?  Yeah, mine doesn't have that) from one of Ross's half-prepared bits.

Here's Ross's:  No doge, T.S. Eliot sees toile stegodon.

Here's mine:  Purely TV ill luck nabs bank; cull Liv Tyler up?

Neither was entered.  Frankly, we did them today, well past the deadline!

Incidentally, we haven't provided a link or plug for TEA Crossword Helper in awhile, but someone must have done so because Ross got an all-time record number of orders last weekend.  Turns out Microsoft has an annual Puzzlehunt event and past winning teams have used TEA.  Someone blogged about that, and the rest, as they say, is more money.  (Still a modest amount, but...)

Other than commerce, we've been making a very leisurely tour of the East Coast of Scotland: Aberdeen, Montrose, St. Andrews, and lunch tomorrow in Edinburgh.  I have pictures, but I'm too much in holiday mode to bother posting them.  Maybe later...

Here are the photos I used in my last post (September 4), and their palindromic connections:

City Hall in Glenelg, South Australia

Neuquen, Argentina

Ada, near Belgrade

It's captioned on Flickr as "Mt. Renier" but of course that's a typo-palindrome.

Hajjah, Yemen

Edde, Byblos, Lebanon

Time for ...
P I C K   A   R A N G E
Here are this week's picks: 

Fewer than 50 -- Ross
50 - 100 -- Phil
100 - 150 -- Magdalen
150 - 200 -- Dave
200 - 250 -- DaveJ
250 - 300
300 - 350 -- Bob
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500
 
500 - 550
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750
750 - 800
800 - 850
850 - 900
900 - 950
950 - 1,000

1,000 - 1,050 -- David
1,050 - 1,100
1,100 - 1,150
1,150 - 1,200
1,200 - 1,250
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350 -- Mendo Jim
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450
1,450 - 1,500

1,500 - 1,550
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000

2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

1 comment:

skydiveboy said...

A new groundbreaking puzzle has just been posted.