Thursday, October 20, 2011

NPR Puzzle 10/16/11 - Your Karma Just Hit My Sex Reassignment Dogma

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of a familiar two-word rhyming phrase that starts with the letter F, like "fat cat." Change the F to a G and you'll get another familiar two-word rhyming phrase. What are these phrases?
At first, we came up with FUN RUN and GUN RUN.  Two obvious problems.  First, Will used FUN RUN as one of his examples on air, presumably because of Problem Two, he doesn't think GUN RUN is a proper form of the noun, GUNRUNNER.  I don't know why it wouldn't be, but he's the puzzle master, and I just write a blog post.

Then Ross solved it again and got the clearly correct answer: FENDER BENDER and GENDER BENDER.

Did anyone figure out my circuitous route to the Photos portion of this post?  Here's what I did.  I looked up FENDER, as in Fender Guitars, in Wikipedia and used six place names.  (I really had to search for them, too!)  In no particular order:

The Bufador, a tourist site in Ensenada, Mexico (one of two Fender manufacturing sites)

The Parrots of Fullerton, California (where Leo Fender founded the Fender Electric Instrument Mfg. Co.)

Scottsdale, Arizona (current corporate home to Fender Musical Instruments Corp.)

Carp jumping among lily pads near about a mile from skydiveboy's house in Seattle, Washington (home of Tacoma Guitars, a subsidiary of Fender)

Corona Lake, Corona, California (home of the other manufacturing facility)

Milwaukee, Wisconsin (where The Stratocaster Chronicles by Tom Wheeler was published in 2004)

Time for ...
P I C K   A   R A N G E
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800 -- Marie
801 - 850 -- Natasha
851 - 900 -- skydiveboy
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Dave
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200 -- Ross
1,201 - 1,250 -- Magdalen
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Mendo Jim
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

7 comments:

skydiveboy said...

I don't mean to carp on this but the photo you used that mentions it is "near Seattle" is in fact very much in Seattle and only about a mile from my house. It is Green Lake and the island you see is Duck Island.

Crossword Man said...

Happy now? :-)

Magdalen said...

LOL

skydiveboy said...

LOL2

Dave said...

SDB, did you refer to Hemingway because he was always drunk (on a bender)? That's what my W.C. (Fields) clue referred to, since he was a noted alcoholic.

skydiveboy said...

Dave:
No! Hemingway was conflicted regarding his sexual orientation throughout his life. He was a "phony" per Zelda Fitzgerald, and she said he was having an affair with F. Scott, her husband. She may have had mental problems, but that in no way meant she was stupid. This is only a minor example of Hemingway's daemons.
If you are actually interested in Hemingway's life story, I would suggest reading, Hemingway, by Kenneth S. Lynn. It is just over 700 pages and fully referenced. He spent ten years in researching and writing this monumental work and it is one of the books I enjoy most in my library. (I will anticipate the question that may next come as to what the other book in my library is by stating that I do not remember as I have not read it yet.) He had no ax to grind, but wrote it on the suggestion of a colleague. Lynn eloquently explains how so many biographers of Hemingway got it all wrong about him by buying into the myth he worked so hard at throughout his life. The real story is far more interesting than the myth and even Hemingway seems to have known the truth would come out eventually.

skydiveboy said...

Take a look; the new puzzle is up now.