Thursday, December 29, 2011

NPR Puzzle 12/25/11 - Evel Knievel, Regifted

Here's this week's puzzle:
Name an occupation in nine letters. It's an entertainer of sorts — an unusual and uncommon but well-known sort of entertainer. Drop the third letter of the name, and read the result backward. You'll get two four-letter words that are exact opposites. What are they?
We've seen a variant of this before, but before I get to that, the answer is DAREDEVIL, or take away the R, it's LIVE + DEAD backwards.

The most famous daredevil in the US was Evel Knievel, the subject of an NPR Puzzle in 2008. But I'd stupidly mentioned that the answer wasn't going to be MIME (wrong number of letters, for a start) and alert reader skydiveboy pointed out that Phillippe Petit was both a mime and a daredevil, assuming you consider tightrope walking across the gap between the twin towers of the World Trade Center to be a daredevil stunt. (The Wiki article on Petit refers to him as a high-wire artist. The word "mime" doesn't appear in the article at all, and "daredevil" appears only in the headline of a press piece cited in the references.)

Here are some daredevils from Flickr:
A real daredevil (in England, I gather)

More daredevils (the finger is not to scale)

A native in Kenya who jumped into Fourteen Falls; the photographer reports the guy got up and asked for money.

Daredevil, the blind superhero played by Ben Affleck in a bad movie, attacking Grey Alien

Not too surprisingly, Daredevil won. (Pens not to scale.)

Future Daredevil, although the parents report the kid couldn't figure out how to get off the trike.
Time for ...


Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200 -- Ross
201 - 250 -- Dave
251 - 300 -- DaveJ
301 - 350 -- Joe Kupe
351 - 400 -- Barbara
401 - 450 -- EKW
451 - 500 -- Skydiveboy
 
501 - 550 -- Marie
551 - 600 -- Magdalen
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

1 comment:

skydiveboy said...

I am disappointed there are no comments in this block so far, therefor I am typing this in order to rectify the situation.