Thursday, December 22, 2011

NPR Puzzle 12/25/11 -- A Holiday Puzzle for Young & Old Alike

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Take the word "at." Put a man's first name on each side of it, and say the word out loud. Phonetically, you'll get a word that describes a growing part of our country. What is it?
There was a moment on Sunday when Ross suggested GERIATRIC but I rejected it because...well, because we simply couldn't hold the precise wording of the puzzle in our head. (It was at the Bertucci's on Queen Street, Exit 31 on I-84 in Connecticut.) We kept trying to think of a growing region in the US like the Corn Belt or Idaho potatoes.

However, all this back and forth did yield a valid (and cuter) alternate answer: Petey + AT + Rick = PEDIATRIC, which works if you interpret "a growing part of our country" as referring to the fact that children grow in size & age (hence, "growing up"). Let's see if Will accepts that as an alternative.

All of Sunday's photos were attributed (via their embedded links) so let's see what we get for Jerry:

Jerry Lee Lewis
and
Jerry Seinfeld
Petey (more commonly a pet's name, from the choice on Flickr--which would rather suggest it's not a "man's name" but that's just silly; of course it's a man's name):

Petey (with Noah)
Petey Williams (there, see? a MAN's name!) (I gather he's a wrestler)
and finally, Rick:

Rick McGirr, who may be famous (it's kinda hard to tell from Google)
Rick Carlisle, head coach of the Dallas Mavericks
Time for ...

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450 -- Natasha
451 - 500 -- Curtis
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Dave
651 - 700 -- Jim (Mendo)
701 - 750
751 - 800 -- Skydiveboy
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200 -- Magdalen
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300 -- Ross
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- Marie
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

3 comments:

Mendo Jim said...

OK, so I had to sit through two sets of photos trickling like treacle
through my Pony Express modem this week. Well, they say that patience comes
with age.
Here is a challenge to look over while waiting for Santa. I would not
recommend trying solve it however:
"This week's challenge comes from listener
Eric Iverson of Eagan, Minnesota: Take a
word that means a shirt or a blouse, for
example, in seven letters. Shift each
letter thirteen spaces around the alphabet,
so that A becomes N, B becomes O, C becomes P, etc. Read the result
backward, and
you'll name a crime. What is it?"
There were a memorable zero correct answers when Will proposed that poser.
More on Sunday.
Merry Christmas

David said...

You know how email and e-commerce are growing?

Emil @ Harry = e-military.

DaveJ said...

Mendo Jim, glad I didn't waste too much time trying to solve the puzzle (you did warn us !)

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