Thursday, April 28, 2011

NPR Sunday Puzzle - Bored in a Room? It's Probably a Boardroom

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Think of a familiar three-word phrase in the form "___ and ___". If you remove the "and" and put the second word in front of the first word, you get a compound word naming a place of power. Hint: The compound word has nine letters. What is the three-word phrase, and what place of power is this?
My hint would have been Donald Trump, if he hadn't been such a putz this week.  But that's what I think of when I think of BOARDROOM (from ROOM and BOARD), particularly as the only board of directors I serve on (for Maternal and Family Health Services, a lovely not-for-profit health care agency that serves low-income women and children in 16 counties in Northeastern Pennsylvania) meets in a nondescript room in an office building.  No paneling or leather chairs in sight.

Ross's photo array last Sunday had all the necessary attributions.  Here, then, are some boardrooms:





Time for  ...
P I C K   A   R A N G E

Here are this week's picks:

Fewer than 50       
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500

500 - 550
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750
750 - 800
800 - 850
850 - 900 -- Ross
900 - 950
950 - 1,000 -- Phil
1,000 - 1,050 -- Dave
1,050 - 1,100
1,100 - 1,150
1,150 - 1,200 -- Magdalen
1,200 - 1,250 -- ~*Kaleena*~
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450
1,450 - 1,500

1,500 - 1,550
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750 -- Mendo Jim
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000 -- Tom
2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Sunday, April 24, 2011

NPR Puzzle 4/24/11 - A Puzzle of Power and Glory

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Think of a familiar three-word phrase in the form "___ and ___". If you remove the "and" and put the second word in front of the first word, you get a compound word naming a place of power. Hint: The compound word has nine letters. What is the three-word phrase, and what place of power is this?
Yes, we used TEA to solve it.  You won't need to because you are all much smarter than us.

Here's where to send your answer now that you've solved it.

What we did was to ask TEA for all the instances of "______ and _______" in 12 letters.  Then I rattled them off in the correct order for the "place of power" (is anyone else thinking superheroes' lairs and the like?).  So TEA and Sympathy becomes "sympathytea" which is not the answer, nor even the correct length.

Speaking of length, did anyone else notice that Dr. Shortz had to tape that added hint separately?  I bet he woke up in the middle of the night, soaked in flop sweat, thinking, "If I don't tell them the length -- wait, or do I mean mass? -- they'll never get it!"

(Can you tell my little puzzle idea that I mentioned last week did not find favor with our good doctor?  *sigh*  He was very gentle, saying that it was "cute" but not cute enough.  Silver lining: I get to be irreverent with him again.  Good thing -- it was starting to hurt, keeping myself on my best behavior.)

As I was rattling off the faux "compound words" generated by TEA Ross said, "Oh, you can use some of those for the photos."  Really?  So I set him the challenge of picking some for the photo section.  Only -- a mishap of marital miscommunication, I guess -- he actually found the photos.  So this week, it's Ross's slide show!

Take it away, Ross --

Sound Safe
Hum, Rattle!
Grab Smash
Teller Pen
Dirty Down
Chip's Fish

Time for ...
P I C K   A   R A N G E

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.

Just over 1,100?  That's a meh answer; no wonder no one picked it.  And it doesn't exactly tell us how many we'll get this week.  Except . . . if you scroll down to Thursday post, you'll notice that I speculated that we'd have more entries than people were predicting because, while the RACETRACE → RACKET puzzle was harder, it was issued on a day when a lot more people go to church.  My pick was just off the mark, but Sarah86 and I came closest.  Today, even more people are going to church -- and the service is likely to be even longer.  More time to solve the puzzle.  I'm just sayin'.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500

500 - 550
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750
750 - 800
800 - 850
850 - 900
900 - 950
950 - 1,000
1,000 - 1,050         
1,050 - 1,100
1,100 - 1,150
1,150 - 1,200
1,200 - 1,250
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450
1,450 - 1,500

1,500 - 1,550
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000
2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Thursday, April 21, 2011

NPR Puzzle 4/17/11 - 10SNE1?

Vanity Plates: What a Racket!

Here's this week's puzzle:
Think of a nine-letter word naming a venue for certain sports. Three letters in the word are repeated. Remove all the repetitions, and the remaining six letters can be rearranged to name a piece of sports equipment. What are these two words?
The answer is RACETRACK - RAC = RACETK = RACKET.

What we did was to mull this over, then look at some crossword reference books that have lists of stuff.  That actually didn't help us except that one book included a cross-reference to horse racing, and well -- the rest is history.

For the photos, I tried to find obscure places with Formula One racetracks:


Sakhir, Bahrain

Bremgarten, Germany

Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India

Shizuoka, Japan (with Mount Fuji)

Hockenheim, Germany

Yeongam Wangin Chrysanthemum Festival, South Korea

There was always a risk that someone would Google >Mount+Fuji+Sports+Venue< and watch that neat trick Google does of "guessing" what you're going to type next.  If you'd Googled >Mount+Fuji+S+P< you'd have seen Mount Fuji Speedway, which is a RACETRACK, and then I've given the game away.  But I liked the photo enough to take the risk.

Time for  ...
P I C K   A   R A N G E

I normally don't comment here on the Thursday post, but Ross and I have a little disagreement going on about the number of entries.  He figures this week's puzzle is harder than last week's, so there will be even fewer entries.  I figure that more people drove to church last Sunday (Palm Sunday), listened to the puzzle on the way, got just a wee bit bored in church so had lots of time to solve the puzzle and then sent it in.  Let's see who's right...

Fewer than 50       
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500

500 - 550
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750 -- Grace
750 - 800 -- Ross
800 - 850 -- Jimel
850 - 900
900 - 950
950 - 1,000 -- Dave
1,000 - 1,050 -- David  
1,050 - 1,100 -- Sarah86
1,100 - 1,150
1,150 - 1,200 -- Magdalen
1,200 - 1,250
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450
1,450 - 1,500

1,500 - 1,550
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000
2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750 -- Mendo Jim
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule: 

In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Sunday, April 17, 2011

NPR Puzzle 4/17/11 - We didn't lose the game ...

... we just ran out of time.  ~Vince Lombardi

Here's this week's puzzle:
Think of a nine-letter word naming a venue for certain sports. Three letters in the word are repeated. Remove all the repetitions, and the remaining six letters can be rearranged to name a piece of sports equipment. What are these two words?
Well, it took us a little time, and cheating only kinda sorta helped (I'll explain our methodology -- which makes very small children hunting for Easter eggs look like guided missiles -- on Thursday),  but we got this one eventually.

Please note, in case it wasn't clear on the radio, that you only remove the repetitions of the letters, not every instance of those letters.  (`Coz if you removed all instances of the repeated letters, you would only have a three letter word...)

Anyway, if I haven't made this puzzle even more obscure, go ahead and send your answer to NPR via this link right here.

(And if you're wondering why I'm not ragging on Dr. Shortz -- clearly it's not an honorary degree in science! -- for misstating what Angstroms measure, it's because I may have an idea for a puzzle myself, and I don't want him to hate me.)

Photos.  I gather I completely missed all sorts of tricks last week, like Angstrom's birthplace and the like, so I'm going to try to do better this time.

All of these places have something in common -- not hard to guess what but even if you do, I don't think you'll be able to back door the puzzle.







Time for ...
P I C K   A   R A N G E

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.

Last week they had just under 800 entries and none of us picked below 1,000.  I think this week's even harder, but it's your guesses that count.  What do you think?

Here are the ranges:

Fewer than 50       
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500

500 - 550
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750
750 - 800
800 - 850
850 - 900
900 - 950
950 - 1,000
1,000 - 1,050         
1,050 - 1,100
1,100 - 1,150
1,150 - 1,200
1,200 - 1,250
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450
1,450 - 1,500

1,500 - 1,550
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000
2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:

In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Thursday, April 14, 2011

NPR Puzzle - Angstroms' Angst

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name a unit of length in the plural form. Rearrange the letters to spell two units of weight, also in the plural form. What units are these?
I thought this was a lovely puzzle, but maybe it's just the chance to use the fancy HTML letters: ångströms = gråms + töns.

Okay, so for the photos, I looked for names of places that could be spelled by the letters in ANGSTROMS:

First up: MontGras, a vineyard.  (I could have included a photo of the wine bottle, but that might have given the game away.)


Monstar next. I have no idea where this is - literally all the Flickr page says is "Monstar."


The letter pattern for this next photo is Mont-ras, north-east Spain:


This is also Mont-ras, but here's the full caption:  Vistas de la Costa Brava entre Platja d'Aro, Torroella de Montgrí y Mont-ras


Morsang-sur-Seine:


And this is Morsang sur Orge:


Time for  ...
P I C K   A   R A N G E

Fewer than 50       
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500

500 - 550
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750
750 - 800
800 - 850
850 - 900
900 - 950
950 - 1,000
1,000 - 1,050 -- Grace   
1,050 - 1,100
1,100 - 1,150 -- Ross 
1,150 - 1,200
1,200 - 1,250 -- Mendo Jim
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350 -- Jimel
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450 -- Dave
1,450 - 1,500 -- Magdalen

1,500 - 1,550 -- David
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000 -- Marie
2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule: 

In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Sunday, April 10, 2011

NPR Puzzle 4/10/11 - Measure for Measures

Here's this week's puzzle:
Name a unit of length in the plural form. Rearrange the letters to spell two units of weight, also in the plural form. What units are these?
I solved this before Ross did.  I'm so chuffed.  (Chuffed is Britspeak for being pleased with oneself.)

If you solved it even before I did -- and I'm sure that you did! -- send your answer in to NPR via this site right here.

By the way, thanks to Ross for pinch-hitting for me on Thursday.  He neglected to mention that the two-word, 11-letter book title that added up to 148 was Little Women.  At least, that's the one I was thinking of.  David's guess of Barry Lyndon is equally valid.

April is all about the quilting for me.  We're going to a wedding at the end of the month and, while the quilt is not a wedding present, I did promise the bride a quilt as a graduation present.  She graduated from law school two years ago...  So I'll be sewing my tiny heart out from now until then.  I'll post photos when I'm done.

I won't short-change you guys, though -- I've got my priorities straight.  But I've got a problem.  I have to come up with photos for units of measurement.

So here's what I've done.  I took the unit of length and asked TEA to give me the longest names I could get out of that word.  I then looked some of them up in Flickr.  Thus, the grand total of points connecting the photos below and the puzzle above are some subset of letters.  Good luck figuring it out from that...







Time for ...
P I C K   A   R A N G E

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.

I had to call Henry to get the announced number of entries because our local NPR affiliate, WVIA, ran long with their Arts Calendar announcements and didn't join the national feed until after Will had started with the on-air puzzle.  (Grrr.)  According to Henry -- and by all means let us know if we got this wrong; I just don't want to wait until the audio file is available at noon DST -- there were "about 1200" entries this week.  If that's right, either no one or Ross is the winner, and as Ross doesn't actually win ("Members of the Crosswordmanblog staff and their families are ineligible to win any prizes"), we're good.

But I need to reiterate for Nameless NPR Intern Whose Job It Is to Tally the Number of Entries Each Week -- dude, you will endear yourself to me immeasurably if you would include whether it's over or under the Nice Round Number.  For everyone else, I will state the obvious: if the number of entries continues to be announced as "about Nice Round Number" we'll treat that as the same as if they said it was precisely Nice Round Number, meaning the tie-break rule is applied.

Here are the ranges:

Fewer than 50       
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500

500 - 550
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750
750 - 800
800 - 850
850 - 900
900 - 950
950 - 1,000
1,000 - 1,050         
1,050 - 1,100
1,100 - 1,150
1,150 - 1,200
1,200 - 1,250
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450
1,450 - 1,500

1,500 - 1,550
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000
2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:

In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Thursday, April 7, 2011

NPR Puzzle 4/3/11 - Telling Your Bedes

Crossword Man here, sitting in for Magdalen, who's unable to access the internet from her usual haunt when on the road. Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Assign every letter of the alphabet a numerical value: A=1, B=2, C=3 and so forth. Think of a classic work of literature that has eight letters in its title. When the letters are given a numerical value, they add up to 35. What's the title? Clue: The title has two words.
An eight-letter, two-word classic work of literature just has to be the Moby Dick, right?

Not this time. Adding the letters of Melville's monumental MO gives you a whopping 82, well above the target of 35. Clearly the title in question must largely use the low-value letters A thru E.

And with that in mind, it isn't too hard to think of Adam Bede ... George Eliot's first novel. Not one I've read, and if I saw the BBC adaptation in the 1990s, it left an indelible blank on my mind. But we did enjoy watching the later North and South serialization recently.

I suppose I'd better try and work out what all those pix have to do with the book. Ah yes, dusting off my old old copy of The Oxford Literary Guide to the British Isles revealed the likely originals of the fictional places in Adam Bede:

Ellastone was the model for the village of Hayslope in the novel

The inspiration for Adam Bede was a story told by George Eliot's auntie, who lived in Wirksworth (above)

Cobblestones in Wirksworth

Ashbourne was the model for Oakbourne in the novel

"Eagle Valley" in Adam Bede is thought to have been modeled on Dovedale (above)

Another image from Dovedale

Time for ...

P I C K   A   R A N G E

Fewer than 50       
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500

500 - 550
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750
750 - 800
800 - 850 -- Phil
850 - 900
900 - 950 -- Grace
950 - 1,000 -- David
1,000 - 1,050 -- Dave   
1,050 - 1,100 -- Henry
1,100 - 1,150 -- Lorenzo
1,150 - 1,200
1,200 - 1,250 -- Ross
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350 -- Mendo Jim
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450
1,450 - 1,500 -- Magdalen

1,500 - 1,550
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000 -- Marie
2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule: 

In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Sunday, April 3, 2011

NPR Puzzle 4/3/11 - This Puzzle is Brought to You By Letters AND Numbers

Here's this week's puzzle:
Assign every letter of the alphabet a numerical value: A=1, B=2, C=3 and so forth. Think of a classic work of literature that has eight letters in its title. When the letters are given a numerical value, they add up to 35. What's the title? Clue: The title has two words.
Ross's first guess was Moby Dick -- arguably the most famous work of fiction in two words, eight letters.  Obviously not the right answer, as 13 + 15 + 2 + 25 + 4 + 9 + 3 + 11 = 82 .  (It would be a fun way to identify what you're reading these days.  "I just finished 148."  "Wait, you mean the 11-letters, 2-words 148?  I loved that book!")

Now, if you know the answer to the 11-letter, 2-word, 148 you can leave us a comment because that's our little puzzle.  (No prize though.  Sorry.)  But if you know the answer to Will Shortz's puzzle, send your answer to NPR here and don't leave it in the comments.

Photos -- Well, there are a TON of neat photos I could have used, but they'd all constitute a hint.  Heck, for all I know, there be hints in the ones I've chosen.  I have tried, though, to keep from giving too much away.







If you can immediately tell the name of the book from those photos, you are either very smart or very lucky or both.

Time for ...
P I C K   A   R A N G E

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.

There were over 2,500 entries, which no one picked.  Not even close.  But that's okay -- Ross sent Phil a special prize (because he rashly indicated he had some interest in cryptic crosswords) last week, so we're still holding onto a more traditional prize for you guys.  You gotta be in it to win it!  So keep working hard to deduce the correct number of entries each week.

Here are the ranges:

Fewer than 50       
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500

500 - 550
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750
750 - 800
800 - 850
850 - 900
900 - 950
950 - 1,000
1,000 - 1,050         
1,050 - 1,100
1,100 - 1,150
1,150 - 1,200
1,200 - 1,250
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450
1,450 - 1,500

1,500 - 1,550
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000
2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule: 

In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")