Sunday, May 29, 2011

NPR Puzzle 5/29/11 - No One Wins This Week...

...because we're all losing Liane Hansen.

I did think that Audie Cornish did a lovely job with the true-false questions, so it will be a pleasure to have her puzzling with Will when the time comes.  But we're still going to miss Liane.

Here are some photos to tide you over till next week:

The only photo (with a Creative Commons license) on Flickr that comes up if you type in "Liane Hansen."  You can click on it to see why, although honestly I'm not sure what the photo has to do with Liane.


The rest of the photos are of words you can make from AAEEHILNNNS (the letters of Liane Hansen):

Hennas:



Linnaean (in this case, the Linnaean Libation League, which meets in the Brooklyn Botanic Garden):


Linens (here they're vintage):


Sea Lane (a miniature steam railway at the North Sea Lane station in Cleethorpes, Lincolnshire):


Alien (the caption explains that their son made the sole alien cookie, which they then didn't want to eat):



Time for ...

P I C K   A   R A N G E

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.

Ah, what to do about Pick-a-Range this week?  I think, to keep it interesting, we'll reopen it.  D'you think hundreds of people will either solve the puzzle or find someone (who, me?) to tell them the answer?  If so, and because we all got caught wrong-footed by Will's change of plans, we're reopening the Pick-a-Range contest.  If you didn't pick last Sunday, pick now.  If you picked last Sunday, you get another shot at it.  Both last Sunday's and today's picks will be counted, so scroll up to see who's already snagged what ranges.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500

500 - 550
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750
750 - 800
800 - 850
850 - 900
900 - 950
950 - 1,000
1,000 - 1,050         
1,050 - 1,100
1,100 - 1,150
1,150 - 1,200
1,200 - 1,250
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450
1,450 - 1,500

1,500 - 1,550
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000
2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Friday, May 27, 2011

NPR Puzzle 5/22/11 - My Rural/Urban Adventure

Back to the business at hand, here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Think of two five-letter words that are exact opposites, in which the first two letters of each word are the same as the first two letters of the other, only reversed. Hint: The fourth letter of each word is A. What two words are these?
As previously announced, the answers are URBAN and RURAL.

Rarely has Dr. Shortz so accurately predicted my week, if only because BORING and QUIET are the answers to no puzzle I can think of.

Two weeks ago, friend-of-the-blog Henry managed to break his arm just below the shoulder.  Actually, having seen the x-rays, he made (as he would say) a fair old mess of it.  The rural emergency room that saw him first just strapped it up and told him to see his regular doctor on Monday.  This led, in a bit of "I've got good news and bad news" to his trying hard to get to see the ace orthopedic surgeon at the very urban teaching hospital in Philadelphia.  Ten days after the accident (he fell off that classic cartoon accessory, a stepladder), he got scheduled for an operation to have surgical steel shish-kabab skewers uh, toothpicks, no, PINS poked into his upper arm.  (In the x-ray, his shoulder looks like someone's playing pick-up sticks in there.)

Here's where my adventure gets started.  (Yes, Henry's rural/urban adventure is way more exciting but he can get his own damned blog - although maybe he should wait until he can type with both hands.)  I drove down on Wednesday.  Admittedly, I was early -- I got there at 11 a.m., when his surgery started, but I had another errand to run and needed to be early for that.  My druthers would have been to get to the hospital around 2:00 p.m. -- allowing the two hours the surgery was to take plus the hour for recovery.

Hah!  That would still have been way too early.  The surgeon finally showed up at 3:30 (the operation had run long), showed me the pretty pictures, and said Henry would be in recovery for around an hour (he was already alert and chatty but I understood he'd need to be monitored).  Three hours later, they finally got him to a room.  Forty-five minutes after that, he was already tired of entertaining a visitor so I left.

Final score: 7 hours of waiting, 45 minutes assuring myself he was alive.  I'd say that was a good trade off.

Yesterday, I had my usual stuff to do outside Philadelphia (dentist, etc.) so I set off from Henry's house in South Philadelphia in the morning, got all that done, then headed back into the city during rush hour.  I had stupidly assumed they wouldn't kick him loose without making us wait for eternity, but actually it was all quite efficient, which meant it was still rush hour when we started heading out of town.  And there was a bad accident on the Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike (a highway I pretty much can't avoid taking to get home), so we opted to have dinner before heading north.

Back to the rural excitement -- lightning, high winds, pouring rain all starting north of Allentown and lasting all the way back to Ross's & my house in the country.  We even got stopped by our volunteer fire company in the middle of the road in our little township -- clearing debris from the storm.

Total time away from home?  Around 38 hours.  How long did it feel like I'd been gone?  A lot longer than that.

Anyway, that's why I didn't even attempt a normal post yesterday.

Here are the photos from Sunday:

Here goes:


This is the Urban Legend that shoes over the power lines denotes a drug dealer's territory.

Rural Route -- in this case, Route 66 in Macoupin County, Illinois - yup, that Route 66!

This *should* be Urban Blight, but it's actually DEAN, as in Rural Dean.  The photo was taken at the Dean Street Skatepark in Bedminster, Bristol, UK  (And yes, that was sneaky of me.)

The photographer titled this "renewal" so I picked it for Urban Renewal

This is a Roman mosaic of a woman athlete in the 4th century.  The notes on the photo explain that this mosaic, and others, are among the finest in the Roman world.  They're found at a villa on an agricultural estate, the heart of the RURAL ECONOMY.  (Yup, I'm bad.)

The caption at Flickr is "pope and me," and supposedly that's Pope John Paul II.  It could be, and I hesitate to suggest it isn't.  I picked it because I like a rural landscape to illustrate POPE URBAN.
So, in the end, Rural (Word A) got 2, 3 & 5; Urban (Word B) got 1, 4 & 6.

Mysteriously, only FOUR people posted comments on Sunday and yesterday's posts.  Using a random number generator seems stupid, but it's what I said I'd do.  It generated "2," which was Mendo Jim (both in order of posting and alphabetically).  So Mendo Jim gets the American Girl puzzle book and another fun puzzle book.  We've got your address, Mendo Jim, so those will go out in a few days.

Similarly, almost no one picked any ranges.  Here's what we've got (Henry gets one in blue because he's officially part of the Crossword Man household for a couple weeks). Edited to add: Dave T. had sent a range in, by email, well within the cut-off. I just forgot.

Time for  ...

P I C K   A   R A N G E

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50       
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500
500 - 550
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750
750 - 800
800 - 850 -- Ross
850 - 900 -- Dave
900 - 950
950 - 1,000 -- Magdalen
1,000 - 1,050 -- David
1,050 - 1,100 -- Henry
1,100 - 1,150
1,150 - 1,200
1,200 - 1,250 -- Mendo Jim
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450
1,450 - 1,500

1,500 - 1,550
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000
2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Thursday, May 26, 2011

For a variety of reasons...

This is a placeholder post.  The answer is URBAN and RURAL.  The Pick-a-Range contest is closed, but comment on Sunday's post and you can still enter the 1,000th post contest.  (The prize is nice, really -- only Mendo Jim gets the American Girl puzzle book.  Trust me.)

I'll do a better post on Friday, okay?

Sunday, May 22, 2011

NPR Puzzle 5/22/11 - Our 1,000th Post!


Yes, faithful friends (and kindly enemies), this is our 1,000th post here at Crossword Man.  We're throwing a party and to celebrate, here's what we're going to do.  We'll pick someone at random from this week's comments and send that person a prize.  (Mendo Jim, if it's you, I promise you'll get the American Girl puzzle book as part of your prize, simply because I know you covet it while simultaneously doubting its existence.)  You don't have to pick a range to enter the "1,000th Post" giveaway, but multiple comments won't increase your chances of getting picked.

But do pick a range -- we'll give that prize as well, provided someone can pick the correct range.  (Ross thinks "more than 2,000" is oddly high in light of the very low ranges that we've been getting recently.)

Remember, comments on today's post close at 3:00 p.m. Thursday, May 26.  We'll announce the winner in that afternoon's post.

Back to the business at hand, here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Think of two five-letter words that are exact opposites, in which the first two letters of each word are the same as the first two letters of the other, only reversed. Hint: The fourth letter of each word is A. What two words are these?
We've worked out the answer -- very nice of Dr. Shortz to give us "A" as a clue -- and I have a cunning idea for my photo array.  All in all, we're happy with this one.

If you are happy with it too, because you've solved it, send that solution in to NPR via this link here.

Before I get to the photos, here's a shout-out to Henry who managed to break his arm last Saturday while cleaning some gutters at a steam train enthusiasts' clubhouse outside Philadelphia.  Henry, we always said you could solve puzzles with one arm behind your back, and I guess having it immobilized in a sling is a sufficient test of that theory.  Heal soon!

Okay, photos -- both words in today's answer appear in some common noun conjunctions.  Not compound words, but two nouns that when strung together convey a specific meaning.  The following photos were found when I entered the other word in the noun conjunctions into Flickr.  So if the answers were BLACK and WHITE, I might have typed in JET and HOUSE.  Got it?  (In two cases, I typed in the entire phrase to get a better selection of photos to choose from -- for example, not four pages of photos of antique airplanes!)

Here's some fun for you -- tell us in the comments which photos (#1, #2, etc.) belong to which of the puzzle answer words, "A" for the word that comes first alphabetically and "Z" for the one that comes later.  So you might think that A gets photos #2,3 & 6, while Z gets photos #1, 4 & 5.

Here goes:







Time for ...

P I C K   A   R A N G E

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.

There were over 2,000 entries.  Wow.  No one, including us, guessed that high, not by a big margin.  Clearly none of us thought so many people would fiddle with those Scrabble (or Bananagrams) tiles for so long!  Good on them, but no prize again this week.

And a huge sigh of relief and thank you for the NPR Intern (my new best friend) and/or Will Shortz (however you say that in Mandarin).  You wouldn't think my life could be improved this much by the words "more than" but it has.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
50 - 100
100 - 150
150 - 200
200 - 250
250 - 300
300 - 350
350 - 400
400 - 450
450 - 500

500 - 550
550 - 600
600 - 650
650 - 700
700 - 750
750 - 800
800 - 850
850 - 900
900 - 950
950 - 1,000
1,000 - 1,050         
1,050 - 1,100
1,100 - 1,150
1,150 - 1,200
1,200 - 1,250
1,250 - 1,300
1,300 - 1,350
1,350 - 1,400
1,400 - 1,450
1,450 - 1,500

1,500 - 1,550
1,550 - 1,600
1,600 - 1,650
1,650 - 1,700
1,700 - 1,750
1,750 - 1,800
1,800 - 1,850
1,850 - 1,900
1,900 - 1,950
1,950 - 2,000
2,000 - 2,050
2,050 - 2,100
2,100 - 2,150
2,150 - 2,200
2,200 - 2,250
2,250 - 2,300
2,300 - 2,350
2,350 - 2,400
2,400 - 2,450
2,450 - 2,500

2,500 - 2,750
2,750 - 3,000
3,000 - 3,250
3,250 - 3,500
3,500 - 4,000
4,000 - 4,500
4,500 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Thursday, May 19, 2011

Crucial Counties

There are 3,143 counties in the USA and somewhat more county seats (since a few counties have more than one capital ... don't ask!).

So how come it's fair to have a clue like {Kentucky county} or {Seat of Washoe County}? Well it wouldn't be unless the county or capital were nationally famous ... or unless the answer had local geographical associations (e.g. there are counties named after the Ozark Mountains, Platte River, Lake Erie) or historical associations (e.g. there are counties in honor of Dan'l Boone, Juan Ponce de León, Thomas Sumter). So chances are such crossword answers will be recognizable for reasons not overtly stated in the clue.

Lee County Courthouse, VA
The rest of the post is a list, by state, of the counties and/or capitals that tend to crop up in crosswords. To avoid repetition, I've excluded two crucial county names that occur in numerous states: Robert E. Lee has counties named after him in eight former Confederate states; James Monroe has counties in his honor in 17 states.


Alabama
Coffee County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Coffee Elba The name Elba was determined in a lottery
Dallas Selma Known for the 1965 Selma Voting Rights Movement


Arkansas
Franklin County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Franklin Ozark Ozark is a corruption of the French "Aux Arc"


Arizona
Pima County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Gila Globe Globe is the western terminus of U.S. Route 70
Pima Tucson Pima is named after the Pima tribe


California
Mariposa County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Alameda Oakland Alameda means "a place where poplar trees grow"
Santa Clara San Jose Much of the county is in Santa Clara Valley (aka Silicon Valley)
Contra Costa Martinez Contra Costa is Spanish for "opposite coast"
Humboldt Eureka Humboldt derived its name from Humboldt Bay
Fresno Fresno Fresno is Spanish for "ash tree"
Madera Madera Madera is the Spanish term for wood
Marin San Rafael Marin County is across the bay from San Francisco
Mariposa Mariposa Mariposa County is known as the "Mother of Counties"
Napa Napa Napa County is known today for its wine industry
Orange Santa Ana Anaheim is in Orange County
San Mateo Redwood City San Mateo is Spanish for Saint Matthew
Shasta Redding Shasta County was named after Mount Shasta
Sonoma Santa Rosa The Sonoma region is known as the "Valley of the Moon"
Ventura Ventura Ojai and Simi Valley are in Ventura County


Colorado
Mesa County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
El Paso Colorado Springs Pikes Peak is in El Paso County
Mesa Grand Junction Mesa County is named for the many large mesas in the area
Costilla San Luis San Luis is the oldest town in Colorado


Florida
Pasco County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Miami-Dade Miami The county is named after Major Francis L. Dade
Pasco Dade City The county is named after Senator Samuel Pasco
Saint Lucie Fort Pierce Fort Pierce is nicknamed the "Sunrise City"
Marion Ocala The county is named after General Francis Marion
Orange Orlando Orlando is nicknamed "The City Beautiful"
Leon Tallahassee The county is named after the Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de León


Georgia
Cobb County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Bibb Macon Little Richard was born in Macon
Macon Oglethorpe Oglethorpe is named for Georgia's founder, James Oglethorpe
Cobb Marietta The county was named for Senator Thomas Willis Cobb


Hawaii
Rainbow Falls
County Capital Factette
Hawaii Hilo Hawaii County is one of seven US counties to share its name with its state
Maui Wailuku Lanai is in Maui County


Idaho
Ada County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Ada Boise Ada is by far the most populous county of Idaho
Teton Driggs The county was named after the Teton Mountains


Illinois
Champaign County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Champaign Urbana Urbana borders the City of Champaign


Indiana
LaPorte County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
LaPorte La Porte LaPorte is nicknamed The Maple City


Iowa
Dolliver Memorial State Park
County Capital Factette
Webster Fort Dodge Fort Dodge is on the Des Moines River
Sac Sac City County and capital are named after the Sac tribe


Kansas
Memorial to the Children Lost on the Trails, Johnson County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Allen Iola Iola is on the Neosho River
Johnson Olathe Olathe is a a suburb of Kansas City, Missouri
Ness Ness City City and County were named for Corporal Noah V. Ness
Osage Lyndon The county is named after the Osage River that runs through it
Shawnee Topeka Topeka is Siouan for "a good place to dig potatoes"


Kentucky
Boone County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Boone Burlington The county is named for frontiersman Daniel Boone


Maryland
Queen Anne's County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Queen Anne's Centreville The county is named for Queen Anne of Great Britain


Massachusetts
Essex County Probate Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Essex Salem and Lawrence MA


Michigan
Wayne County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Huron Bad Axe The county is located at the northern tip of the Thumb
Ionia Ionia The county was named after the ancient region of Ionia
Wayne Detroit The county was named for general "Mad Anthony" Wayne


Minnesota
Winona County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Hennepin Minneapolis The county was named for the17th-century explorer Father Louis Hennepin
Mille Lacs Milaca Milaca is situated on the Rum River
Winona Winona The names are said to derive from the Princess Winona legend


Missouri
Ste. Genevieve County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Osage Linn The county was named for the Osage River
Ozark Gainesville The county was named after the Ozark Mountains
Platte Platte City The county was named for the Platte River
Ste. Genevieve Ste. Genevieve The county was named for the patron saint of Paris


Montana
Teton County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Deer Lodge Anaconda The name Anaconda was chosen in lieu of Copperopolis
Silver Bow Butte Butte is the birthplace of Evel Knievel and Martha Raye
Lewis and Clark Helena Helena is nicknamed Queen City of the Rockies
Teton Choteau Choteau is named after the fur trader Pierre Chouteau, Jr.


Nebraska
Otoe County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Otoe Nebraska City The county is named for the Otoe Indians
Platte Columbus The county is named after the Platte River


Nevada
Washoe County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Elko Elko The names are taken from the Shoshoni word for "white woman"
White Pine Ely Ely is home to the Nevada Northern Railway
Nye Tonopah Tonopah is nicknamed "Queen of the Silver Camps"
Washoe Reno Washoe County is home to the annual Burning Man Festival


New Hampshire
Hillsborough County Courthouse
County Capitals Factette
Hillsborough Manchester & Nashua The county was named for Wills Hill, the Viscount Hillsborough


New Jersey
Essex County Courthouse Lioness
County Capital Factette
Essex Newark Aaron Burr was born in Newark
Ocean Toms River Ocean County is on the Jersey Shore
Passaic Paterson Paterson is known as the "Silk City"
Sussex Newton Sussex County is the northernmost in NJ


New Mexico
Doña Ana County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Doña Ana Las Cruces Las Cruces is nicknamed "The City of the Crosses"
Otero Alamogordo The White Sands National Monument is in Otero County
Taos Taos The D. H. Lawrence Ranch is Taos County


New York
Tioga County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Erie Buffalo Buffalo is the second most populous city in NY
Nassau Mineola Nassau County is on Long Island
Niagara Lockport Lockport's name comes from a set of Erie canal locks
Oneida Utica The county is named in honor of the Oneida tribe
Oswego Oswego The city of Oswego is on the Oswego River
Otsego Cooperstown Cooperstown is home to the National Baseball Hall of Fame
Tioga Owego Tioga derives from an American Indian word meaning "at the forks"
Ulster Kingston Woodstock is in Ulster County


North Carolina
Randolph County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Randolph Asheboro The county was named for Peyton Randolph
Ashe Jefferson The county was named for NC governor Samuel Ashe
Alamance Graham Elon University is in Alamance County


North Dakota
Ward County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Ward Minot Minot is known as Magic City


Ohio
Van Wert County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Champaign UrbanaChampaign takes its name from the French word for "open level country"
Erie Sandusky The Cedar Point amusement park is in Sandusky
Van Wert Van Wert County and capital are named for Isaac Van Wart
Greene Xenia Xenia (ξενία) means "hospitality" in Greek


Oklahoma
Pontotoc County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Pontotoc Ada Ada was named after the daughter of an early settler
Garfield Enid Enid was on the Chisholm Trail
Osage Pawhuska The county is coterminous with the Osage Indian Reservation


Pennsylvania
Susquehanna County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Erie Erie Erie is known as the "Flagship City"
Susquehanna Montrose Crossword Man lives here


South Carolina
Sumter County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Sumter Sumter County and capital are named for General Thomas Sumter


South Dakota
Custer County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Custer Custer County and capital are named for General George Armstrong Custer


Tennessee
Overton County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Overton Livingston The county is named for Memphis co-founder John Overton


Texas
McLennan County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Angelina Lufkin Angelina is also a National Forest
Jackson Edna The county is named for Andrew Jackson
El Paso El Paso El Paso is across the Rio Grande from Ciudad Juárez
Gregg Longview The county is named for Confederate general John Gregg
Menard Menard The county is named for Michel Branamour Menard
Palo Pinto Palo Pinto Palo Pinto roughly translates as "painted stick"
McLennan Waco Waco is on the Brazos River


Utah
Utah County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Utah Provo Crossword fav Orem is also in Utah County
Wasatch Heber City Wasatch means "mountain pass" in Ute


Virginia
Amelia County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Amelia Amelia CourthouseThe county is named for Princess Amelia of Great Britain


Washington
King County Administration Building
County Capital Factette
King Seattle Originally named after William Rufus King, the county now honors Martin Luther King, Jr
Yakima Yakima The names originate from the Yakama Nation


Wisconsin
Racine County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Winnebago Oshkosh Oshkosh is located where the Fox River enters Lake Winnebago
Racine Racine "Racine" is French for "root"


Wyoming
Albany County Courthouse
County Capital Factette
Laramie Cheyenne The capital was named for the Cheyenne nation
Albany Laramie Laramie is located on the Laramie River
Teton Jackson Jackson Hole is in Teton County