Sunday, October 30, 2011

NPR Puzzle 10/30/11 - Logo to Go-Go?

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a well-known singer. Drop the first and last letters of the singer's first name and you'll get the letters of a well-known company. Drop the first and last letters of the singer's last name, and you'll identify the logo that the company is classically known for. Who is the singer and what's the company?
We were in a bit of a hurry to solve this as we need to get on the road promptly this morning -- in fact, we'll be listening to the puzzle in the car like so many other people.  I'm "pre-blogging" this so that you'll have it to look at, but if Will says something funny (peculiar or ha-ha) on-air, please know I'm not intentionally ignoring it.

And if someone won the Pick-A-Range, we'll discuss that in the comments when we get back to our computers.

I'll be honest - I never solved it. Ross did. Not sure what method(s) he used, although I know there was a list of singers involved. (I'd used a list of singers, too - my list didn't include our corporate logo singer.)

Regardless of how you got it, if you know the answer, send it in to NPR using this cunning form right here. (That sounds rude, doesn't it? I don't mean it to.)

Photos - you know how I roll when it's a famous person: look up their Wiki page & find photos from places mentioned on that page.  That's what I did here:







Time for ...


P I C K   A   R A N G E

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.
 
As I mentioned above, I've "time-shifted" the blogging this week. Did you win? If so, there'll be a delay in getting your prize to you. And if you didn't win last week, try to win this week. Pick a range in the comments to see if you'll win a prize!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print. 

Thursday, October 27, 2011

NPR Puzzle 10/23/11: Will Shortz Takes a Long Walk Off Pier 1

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of a two-word name of a nationally known chain of retail stores. Insert the second word of the name into the exact middle of the first. The result will spell the name of a well-known electronics manufacturer. What are these names?
The intended answer is Pier One: Insert ONE into PIER and you get PIONEER.

Let's quickly mention the problems this puzzle has.  The store is Pier 1 Imports -- that's actually what is on the building (I drove past the store in Dickson City, PA today) -- and while it's true that we know what you mean if you write Pier One, it doesn't look right because it isn't right.  We're visually trained to recognize the typography:


So if Will had wanted the puzzle to read correctly, he'd have had to say something like, "Take the name of a national chain of retail stores. Reduce it to the informal two-word name everyone uses.  Insert the second word of the name into the exact middle of the first. The result will spell the name of a well-known electronics manufacturer. What are these names?"  I think that works because translating Pier 1 Imports into Pier One (two words as opposed to a word and a number) gets you to where you need to be.

(Personally? I think Will just didn't bother to verify that Pier 1 Imports isn't Pier One.)

There were a couple different ways to solve this. One is to have the answer pop up in your brain like Aphrodite rising from the waves. That's how Ross solved it. I tried to find the electronics company on Wikipedia, only AT THE TIME it didn't appear on the list.  (Ross added it today.)  That does make it harder to "cheat." (Conspiracy theory: Might Doug Heller of Flourtown, PA have removed "Pioneer Company" from the Wiki page just for the five days the puzzle was active? Would Will Shortz have done that?)

Because it's Thursday, here's a gratuitous plug for Ross's 99 ¢ book for the Kindle:  The Crossword Man Book of Anagrams. Remember, it will make a great stocking stuffer for those digital stockings hung over your virtual fire.

For photos, I went to "Pioneer" on Wiki.  I never got to the "right" page because the "disambiguation" page yielded more than enough specific place names.  In no particular order, then:

Whittier, California, home of Pioneer High School

Ellwood, Illinois, home to a sculpture by Lorado Taft entitled "The Pioneers"

Laughlin, Nevada - no, really! - home of the Pioneer Hotel & Gambling Hall

Haviland Pond, Ludlow, Massachusetts, home to the Western Massachusetts Pioneers, an American soccer team

Visalia, California, home to "The Pioneer" a sculpture by Solon Borglum

Baffin Island, which has a Pioneer Pass (I did look for a photo of the pass but no joy)

Time for ...
P I C K   A   R A N G E
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600 -- Henry
601 - 650 -- Ross
651 - 700 -- Magdalen
701 - 750
751 - 800 -- skydiveboy
801 - 850
851 - 900 -- Marie
901 - 950 -- Dave
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150 -- phredp
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Mendo Jim
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Sunday, October 23, 2011

NPR Puzzle 10/23/11 - Shopping Tripped Up

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of a two-word name of a nationally known chain of retail stores. Insert the second word of the name into the exact middle of the first. The result will spell the name of a well-known electronics manufacturer. What are these names?
Ross solved this one.  On Thursday, I will explain why my efforts to cheat didn't work.  Thank God Ross's brain came up with the answer "the natural way."

And after you've solved it the "natural way" so go ahead and send your answers in to NPR here!

Big excitement this week chez CrosswordMan!  The dog got skunked -- and Ross has published a digital book.  (No relation between those two facts, by the way.)  I can't tell you what the magic weapon is in dealing with a skunky dog, because she still smells bad.  But the house is MUCH better because of a tip I got off the Internet:  Bake a pan of cinnamon in a 250° oven for 1 hour.  At the end of that time, the house smelled like the inside of a scented candle shop in the mall, but that's better than what it had smelled like.

The book?  It's an anagram book for your Kindle.  Okay, so mostly it's a test case so that we can learn how to publish books ("we" being a euphemism for "Ross did all the work") before Harmony Road Press goes live later this year.  I'd suggest you all buy a copy, but it may turn out to be "the prize" for the Pick-a-Range contest...Nah, it's only 99¢ so you should all buy a copy, if you have a Kindle, that is.

Photo time.  Once again, I've picked one of the words or names in this week's puzzle and looked it up in Wiki.  I never got to the "right" page because the "disambiguation" page yielded more than enough specific place names.  In no particular order, then:







Time for ...

P I C K   A   R A N G E

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.
Oh, Unpaid & Underappreciated Intern, you wound me.  The stated number of entries this morning was "around 600."  What happened to "delightfully specific"?  No winner this week.   

Pick a range in the comments to see if you'll win a prize!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print. 

Thursday, October 20, 2011

NPR Puzzle 10/16/11 - Your Karma Just Hit My Sex Reassignment Dogma

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of a familiar two-word rhyming phrase that starts with the letter F, like "fat cat." Change the F to a G and you'll get another familiar two-word rhyming phrase. What are these phrases?
At first, we came up with FUN RUN and GUN RUN.  Two obvious problems.  First, Will used FUN RUN as one of his examples on air, presumably because of Problem Two, he doesn't think GUN RUN is a proper form of the noun, GUNRUNNER.  I don't know why it wouldn't be, but he's the puzzle master, and I just write a blog post.

Then Ross solved it again and got the clearly correct answer: FENDER BENDER and GENDER BENDER.

Did anyone figure out my circuitous route to the Photos portion of this post?  Here's what I did.  I looked up FENDER, as in Fender Guitars, in Wikipedia and used six place names.  (I really had to search for them, too!)  In no particular order:

The Bufador, a tourist site in Ensenada, Mexico (one of two Fender manufacturing sites)

The Parrots of Fullerton, California (where Leo Fender founded the Fender Electric Instrument Mfg. Co.)

Scottsdale, Arizona (current corporate home to Fender Musical Instruments Corp.)

Carp jumping among lily pads near about a mile from skydiveboy's house in Seattle, Washington (home of Tacoma Guitars, a subsidiary of Fender)

Corona Lake, Corona, California (home of the other manufacturing facility)

Milwaukee, Wisconsin (where The Stratocaster Chronicles by Tom Wheeler was published in 2004)

Time for ...
P I C K   A   R A N G E
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800 -- Marie
801 - 850 -- Natasha
851 - 900 -- skydiveboy
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Dave
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200 -- Ross
1,201 - 1,250 -- Magdalen
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Mendo Jim
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Sunday, October 16, 2011

NPR Puzzle 10/16/11 - Fine Whine

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of a familiar two-word rhyming phrase that starts with the letter F, like "fat cat." Change the F to a G and you'll get another familiar two-word rhyming phrase. What are these phrases?
I don't know if we have THE answer, but we have AN answer.  And truly, my reaction was, "That's it?"  Maybe that is it.  {Edited to add that we were solving the puzzle as it appeared on the NPR website after midnight -- not as Will recited it on the radio.}

brief pause

Nope -- Ross has solved it again and gotten the RIGHT answer.  I know it's the right answer because when I heard it, I said, "Ah, yes, that's much better."

Silent challenge to Dr. Shortz -- what's the "that's it?" solution?

For the rest of you, send your obviously right answer in to NPR using this cute little form right here.

I'm going to invoke the No Hinting rule this week, because I do think there's a delight in having the answer finally occur to you.  Seeing it through a clever but transparent hint may not be as much fun.

In that same spirit, I've taken a circuitous route to the Photos portion of this post.  One of the three words involved in this puzzle has a Wiki page for reasons I can't explain.  In that Wiki post are six place names.  In no particular order:







Time for ...

P I C K   A   R A N G E

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.
Thank you, Unpaid & Underappreciated Intern!  The stated number of entries this morning was "over 800."  Once again, delightfully specific!  No winner this week.  I'm renewing my offer -- if the Unpaid & Underappreciated Intern would like to get in touch, I'll happily send him/her a thank you gift.  You -- anyone, really -- can mail me at Magdalen {at} Crosswordman.com.) 

Pick a range in the comments to see if you'll win a prize!  (And Dave, you gotta get your pick in before Thursday afternoon.  If we're late posting on Thursday, that's fine, but Saturday?  Dude, read the rules!)

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print. 

Thursday, October 13, 2011

NPR Puzzle 10/9/11 - Crabby Reindeer on Dancing With the Constellations?

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name something that is part of a group of twelve. Change the first letter to the next letter of the alphabet to name something that is part of a group of nine. What are these things?
Once you get past months of the year and positions in a baseball game, this gets a bit easier.  I actually asked Google for things that came in twelves, but I still wouldn't have solved it if I hadn't also asked for things that come in a nine-pack.  Or, at least, I think I wouldn't have -- it was late (NPR posts the puzzle at midnight east coast time) and I get a bit blurry in the wee hours of the morning.

Anyway, the answers are CANCER, a sign of the zodiac, and DANCER, a reindeer in the post-Rudolph collection.

My compliments to Jim and others for taking Blogger head-on in order to post their comments. Blogger sucks, but then Ross and I must also suck for being too lazy to move the blog to Word Press (which also sucks, albeit less badly).

Here's what I had to say about photographs:
Take one of the two words that make up the answer.  Think of another word for that thing.  Here are some photos of various things, the names of which combine with the new word, usually to make a noun conjunction.  (Like "watch strap," in case you were wondering what a noun conjunction was.)
and here's what my thinking was.  CANCER is the CRAB.  If you look for types of crabs and pass over the obvious names like MARYLAND, ALASKAN KING, and BLUE, you get some fun words:

Flower Crab

Coral Crab

Stilt Crab

Bubble Crab

Garland Crab (what - you were expecting "Wedding Reception Crab" or "Table Skirt Crab"?)

Velvet Crab

Time for ...
P I C K   A   R A N G E
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450 -- Natasha
451 - 500 -- Mendo Jim
 
501 - 550 -- skydiveboy
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Marie
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200 -- Ross
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500 -- Magdalen

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Sunday, October 9, 2011

NPR Puzzle 10/9/11 -- Multiples of Three

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name something that is part of a group of twelve. Change the first letter to the next letter of the alphabet to name something that is part of a group of nine. What are these things?
Ah, that wasn't so very hard.

You'll want to send your right answer in to NPR using this form right here.

Don't ask me what I'm going to do about photographs.  I have at least a paragraph to think of something.

Oh, heck, now I have to think of a subject for the paragraph that's going to give me time to think of something to do for photographs...

Okay, here we go.  Take one of the two words that make up the answer.  Think of another word for that thing.  Here are some photos of various things, the names of which combine with the new word, usually to make a noun conjunction.  (Like "watch strap," in case you were wondering what a noun conjunction was.)







Time for ...
P I C K   A   R A N G E

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.
Thank you, Unpaid & Underappreciated Intern!  The stated number of entries this morning was "around 470."  Beautifully specific!  No winner, but if the Unpaid & Underappreciated Intern would like to get in touch, I'd happily send him/her a thank you gift.  You -- anyone, really -- can mail me at Magdalen {at} Crosswordman.com.) 

Pick a range to see if you'll win a prize!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print.