Thursday, January 12, 2012

NPR Puzzle 1/8/12 - Skittled

This is Crossword Man again, as Magdalen's still in Maine. Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Name four parts of a car that are also terms used in a particular game. One of the parts is spelled in three letters, two of them in five letters each, and one has six letters. Two places a car might go are also terms used in the game. What game is it, and what are the terms?
Things haven't been going well for me this week: I have to confess to not having an answer for you. Plus Mendo Jim says blogger is playing up and not letting him add a comment ... which might explain why only three ranges have been plucked this week.

Anyway, my best guess at the game is ten-pin bowling, since that has well-known terms that are places a car might go: to wit an alley and a lane. Five-letter bowling terms include spare and frame.

I also thought the three-letter term might be pin - there have got to be pins in a car, right? But that didn't satisfy my sense of esthetic.

It gets worse when you look into the six-letter terms. OK, you can find ones like clutch if you plumb the depths of the online glossaries like the one at Bowler's Paradise. But they're not exactly strongly associated with the game, for anyone who doesn't play it.

So I suspect I've missed this one. On the plus side, I can remember the answer to my own picture puzzle, which is cricket. Here are the pix recaptioned with the relevant cricketing term:

Square leg(s) [fielding position]

Duck [batsman's score of zero]

Nelson [a score of 111, regarded as unlucky]

Googly [a deceptive type of delivery by a spin bowler]

Beamer [a delivery reaching the batsman at head height without bouncing]


Time for ...
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50 -- Ross
 51 - 100 -- Magdalen
101 - 150
151 - 200 -- Dave
201 - 250
251 - 300 -- Skydiveboy
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

1 comment:

skydiveboy said...

Maybe it is fixed now???
I have been unable to post or access any of the comments since last evening until just now.

Bumper is an obscure bowling term, as is emblem and strike works if you consider that every door has a strike. UGH! I know, I know.

This is a really, really bad puzzle. So far both puzzles this year suck. Ladies Golf makes about as much sense to me as Ladies Engineering.