Thursday, March 22, 2012

NPR Puzzle 3/18/12 - Will Shortz (& Mike Reiss) Go Green!

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Take the phrase "no sweat." Using only these seven letters, and repeating them as often as necessary, can you make a familiar four-word phrase? It's 15 letters long. What is it?
Did anyone else notice that this puzzle came hard on the heels of St. Patrick's Day? Because we were goin' green with this one. Green as in "ecologically-minded"; the answer is WASTE NOT WANT NOT.

I may have succeeded in making it HARD this week, as no one commented and no one emailed me the connection, which is BEN FRANKLIN. Supposedly, the expression "waste not want not" is credited to Franklin, who had rather a brisk trade in "wise sayings."



That's a clip from Stan Freberg Presents the United States of America, Volume One: The Early Years -- and yes, you are watching the guy's record spinning on an old-style turntable -- featuring Ben Franklin. That's how I learned about "wise sayings."

So, in honor of my childhood (we wore through our copy of Stan Freberg Presents the United States of America, Volume One: The Early Years), I ignored those sources that suggested Ben Franklin, if he had anything to do with the expression "waste not want not," tweaked it from a 16th century expression, "willful waste makes woeful want." And a good thing he did, as that longer saying doesn't condense to anything so neat as "no sweat." But whether Franklin thought it up on his own, edited someone else's "wise saying," or actually had nothing to do with it, his was the Wiki page I used for my photo array.

Franklin's father, Josiah, was born in Ecton, Northamptonshire (this plaque just happens to be in Ecton; the Franklins were long gone by 1752)

Franklin's mother, Abiah Folger, was born in Nantucket, Massachusetts

This is St. Bartholomew-the-Great in the Smithfield area of London; Ben Franklin worked as a typesetter in a print shop in this space in the mid-1720s

Père Lachaise Cemetary in Paris. Ben Franklin's grandson, Temple Franklin, is buried here.

According to Wiki, Ben Franklin charted the Gulf Stream, a document ignored in his time. Someone found the original British publication in the Bibliothèque Nationale in 1980

Pennsylvania Hospital, founded in 1751 by Franklin and Dr. Thomas Bond. That's probably Ben Franklin on the plinth.

Time for...
Here are this week's picks:

Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Skydiveboy
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700 -- Joe Kupe
701 - 750
751 - 800 -- Marie
801 - 850 -- Magdalen
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry
1,101 - 1,150 -- Jim (Mendo)
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350 -- Ross
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450 -- Dave
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- Howard
1,551 - 1,600 
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

The word I referred to was MOTTAINAI, though the Wikipedia entry does not mention the specific patent law usage.

Henry BW