Sunday, March 4, 2012

NPR Puzzle 3/4/12 - Can't See The Forest = The Trees + No Facets

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Take the trees hemlock, myrtle, oak and pine. Rearrange the letters in their names to get four other trees, with one letter left over. What trees are they?
I'm afraid this is easy for us because, you know, we have software that just does this stuff. I know. That's "cheating." Which is why we don't enter the puzzle.

But you all are WAY smarter than we are, and so don't need a computer. You probably did it in your head. (You will need a computer to send the answer in to NPR via this link right here, though.)

Photos. For once, I'm giving you THE ANSWERS (well, some of them, mixed in with some of the trees you start with).

Enjoy. (Personally, I think it must still be easier to solve the puzzle with Scrabble or Bananagram tiles, but if you want to whip out your faithful Peterson Guide to Trees, knock yourselves out.)







Time for...
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.

Rachel announced that they had more than 1350 entries. That means Curtis wins. Do we have your address, Curtis? Send it to me [Magdalen (at) CrosswordMan dot com] and we'll mail out your prize. (And I will mail out Joe's prize from last week--sorry, the Dreaded Lurgi sapped my will to get stuff done.) For everyone else, try to guess how many entries this week's relatively easy puzzle will yield and you too could win a cheesy prize!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print. 

12 comments:

skydiveboy said...

After solving this last night I needed a shot of my favorite.

351 for this week.

Anonymous said...

Very pretty, but looking up my candidate trees to see if their leaves match your pictures would probably be more trouble than it's worth.

My usual 1051-1100, please.

Henry BW

Marie said...

What a refreshing change, I sat right down and wrote out the answer within minutes, I'm going with a big week--1551-1600.

Anonymous said...

I tried the "doing it in my head" thing while still in bed and actually got pretty close.
I find myself checking out the mystery scribbles before I write the post to make sure I can at least come close to deciphering them. (ps, I didn't)

I wonder how much it costs to phone Guam.

Mendo Jim

David said...

The first tree was obvious, then second tree used a lot of the "difficult" letters.

The remaining letters could be anagrammed into at least three different trees. One pair of the three fit the solution, but it made me wonder if this is another puzzle with multiple solutions (although I haven't come up with a second one yet).

I'll try my standard 1001 to 1050 range again, please.

Curtis said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Curtis said...

This puzzle reminds me of cinema candy and nursery rhymes. I'll take my usual 1351 - 1400, please.

Dave said...

Piping in with 1301 - 1350. Even easier than last week's puzzle.

Joe Kupe said...

Spring is coming, hope I pruned all my trees. 801 - 850 please.

Tobias Duncan said...

I will take 1401 to 1450

skydiveboy said...

"my favorite" was a hint at Old Hickory Bourbon.

Dave said...

My piping in referred to the Lemon Pipers, a sixties group.