Sunday, April 1, 2012

NPR Puzzle 4/1/12 April Fool's Day - or - Opening Day of Baseball?

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name some things seen at a baseball game. This is a two-word phrase, four letters in each word. Change one letter in each word to a new letter to get a new two-word phrase that names a popular music group of the past. Name the group.
Not hard, we thought. But maybe there's a practical joke we're not seeing...?

We're not fooling around, though, when we say this is the place to send in your answer to NPR.

Oh, boy, am I going to have fun with the photos. You may recognize the location(s), but can you figure out the connection to today's puzzle?







Time for...
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.

Over 1000 entries, which means David, the squatter at 1,001-1,050, is the winner. Finally. And for being such a homebody parked at the same range for so long, we're sending him a English Puzzport that Ross bought in the UK. Wicked cute. The current puzzle? Could be so easy it breaks through the 2,000 barrier.  Submit your guess for the number of entries to be announced next Sunday on the radio and maybe you'll win some overseas prize.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print. 

11 comments:

Curtis said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Curtis said...

I thought last week's puzzle was pretty easy, and it only generated 1000+ entries. This week's is still pretty easy, but I'll stick with my usual 1351 - 1400 guess anyway. I disagree with the puzzle phrasing referring to the group as "of the the past." One of the original members continues to tour under this band's name with some newer recruits.

Anonymous said...

I was still grumbling to myself about being taken in by the Beetoven's Tenth Symphony April Fool's segment so this took ten minutes instead of five.

It is sure hard to find the group's name with only two words, but Will has shown himself to be quite comfortable in the past with this error.

If I had only given a hundred people the answer to send in, I would have won. So 1101+ again please.

I think Will said no tricks on the challenge.

Good luck on the Golden Heart.

Mendo Jim

David said...

I really wanted the answer to be "Cold beer" or "Babe Ruth".

Didn't seem that Will tried to steer the on-air player away from midnight on the first puzzle? And I figure the full wine bottle would land in Cork.

I guess I need to continue to squat on 1001 to 1050.

skydiveboy said...

I say the full bottle would land on the ground first because the weight of the bottle would allow it to sink to the bottom of the ocean. He did not say dry ground. I also found this question to be interesting as NPR fairly recently had some physics professor talking about how ignorant his students were and gave an example of asking them which ball would hit the ground first if they took them to the second floor window of the building they were in and dropped them at the same moment. One is heavier than the other, of course. He went on to say many of them thought the heavier ball would hit first and that that was incorrect and that objects fall at the same rate. What an idiot! Objects do not fall at the same rate and it cannot be proven at such a low height. Any avid skydiver knows the truth of this no matter what it may say on the internet or what some ignorant high school science teacher may argue not to mention that other idiot on NPR, Ira Flatow, who still seems to believe objects were proven to fall at the same rate. My high school science teacher was not an idiot and we were taught that objects fall at the same rate in a vacuum. This is a subject that really sets me off because of all the ignorant people, including teachers, in this country. On the other hand if you should drop an anti-Darvinian and Ira Flatow from a hot air balloon, which one would hit first, the lighter one or the heavier one?
Answer: Who cares?

Tobias Duncan said...

This is a multiple answer puzzle for sure with:

the GOOD BARS
and
the WOOL HATS
Two of my favorite underground 80s bands...


I will go with 1251 to 1300

Dave said...

I'll take a swing at 1101 to 1150.

Marie said...

And I'll slide into the 1301-1350 slot.

Anonymous said...

Posting anon is sort of like the definition of psychosis.
Somebody check the spam heap.
Mendo Jim

David said...

I know this doesn't actually work as a solution on several dimensions, but how about "ball" and "mates" (as in teammates) getting to "Hall and Oates"?

skydiveboy said...

1301