Sunday, April 22, 2012

NPR Puzzle 4/22/12 - Something's Rot-13 in Denmark?

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of a common man's name in four letters, one syllable. Move each letter exactly halfway around the alphabet. For example, A would become N, N would become A, and B would become O. The result will be a common woman's name in two syllables. What names are these?
According to Ross, this cipher is known as Rot-13. Don't ask me why. Maybe when he's not half-asleep he'll be able to explain. Anyway, in order to solve it quickly, he used his clicky fingers and software expertise (yes, even half-asleep) and solved the puzzle.

When you've solved it using a wide-awake noggin, send the answer in here.

We were in Asheville, North Carolina last week. Lovely place. Last time we stayed at a fancy-schmancy bed and breakfast. This time we stayed at a cabin. A very lovely, well-appointed cabin, but still, no High Victoriana in sight. Instead, the deck seemed like a tree-house.  Absolutely lovely...except for the bronchitis I drove down with, and still managed to have on the trip up. Oh, I'm okay, just Wheezy (aka the 8th dwarf).

For photos, I've snitched some places from two famous people's Wiki pages, one guy with the masculine name and one woman with the feminine name. Enjoy!







Time for...

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.

Almost 2000 entries, which means once again no one won and also the number of entries is still going up. Are the puzzles easier? More people listening? You can't tell from our Pick-a-Range entries, which dipped last week. Beef up our numbers this week and submit your guess for the number of entries to be announced next Sunday on the radio and if guess correctly, you'll win a prize.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print. 

7 comments:

Marie said...

I'm going to stay with 1701-1750. Although I solved it somewhat quickly by hand (brute force method), I think it is harder than last week's puzzle. If I win this time, I'll stash the prize

Anonymous said...

"...common woman's name..."??

The answer I have is the one roundly hinted at over at Blaine's.
Unless we are all wrong, Will must know different folks than I do.

Maybe "uncommon" might have been too much of a hint, but at least it would not have been misleading.

Another possibility is a famous cartoonist, song writer and author who scorned his gal.

1101+ agin, pleeze.

Mendo Jim

skydiveboy said...

I have an answer with two common names, but I doubt it is what Will intended. I will predict 399.

Anonymous said...

If the name gets several million hits on an internet search engine, but they all seem to be for the same person, is that "common"?

My usual 1051-1100, please.

Henry BW

Dave said...

Putting my money on 901 to 950.

Curtis said...

I think the masculine name is more common, but I think one individual with the feminine name is more well-known than most men with the masculine name. I'll go back to my standby guess of 1351-1400.

David said...

It took me a lot longer to get my answer this time, so I will go back to my normal 1001 to 1050. While on my Sunday run, I got stuck on the wrong 2 letters for ending the names (but the final letter was right).

More comments on how I got the answer on Thursday.