Friday, May 25, 2012

I Think I'd Better Put Some Thought Into This Post

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Think of a common three-letter word and five-letter word that together consist of eight different letters of the alphabet. Put the same pair of letters in front of each of these words, and you will have the present and past tense forms of the same verb. What words are these?
I got this by asking TEA for the following pattern: 12345_12*

In English, that would be a five-letter word of five different letters, followed by another word starting with the same two letters as the first one. Frankly, I was bloody lucky that "THINK THROUGH" is a phrase. And look, it's also a three-letter word (INK) and a five-letter word (ROUGH), with TH- at the beginning of each. I'm guessing Dr. Shortz didn't notice that.

Photos. The hardest part was not using the words THINK, INK, THOUGHT, OUGHT, or TH/ROUGH in my intro. But I did use THINK in my search parameters in Flickr. After rejecting all the portraits of people looking like pansies (see #3), here's what I found:


A Thinking Chair (as in, one you sit in while thinking, not a sentient piece of furniture)

This photo taken in Bodensee, Germany prompted someone named Jasmine to write (or quote) a poem, "Thinking of You."

The giveaway photo, as PANSY comes from the same Latin root (heh heh), PENSARE, as the French word, PENSÉE, for "to think."

Positive Thinking in Urban Development (I just liked the colors)

This is someone's thinking spot.

Another photo that inspired someone to poetry, again about thinking of that special someone. (They look like clouds to me...)

Time for...
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600 -- KevinK
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900 -- skydiveboy
901 - 950 -- Dave
951 - 1,000 -- Magdalen

1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- HenryBW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 -- Ross
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750 -- Mendo Jim
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,050 -- itSMF as told by Barbara
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500 -- Marie
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 + new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

1 comment:

skydiveboy said...

I wonder if Will was aware that he used one of the answer words—THINK—as the first word in the puzzle question. "THINK of a word....."