Thursday, May 31, 2012

NPR Puzzle 5/27/12 - The Hint of a Woman

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name two different kinds of wool. Take the first five letters of one, followed by the last three letters of the other. The result will spell the first and last name of a famous actor. Who is it?
The answer, for the only person out there who doesn't already know, is AL PACINO (ALPACa + merINO).

Someone asked in the comments to last Sunday's post what my policy was on hints in the comments. I had to think about that. My favorite hints are the ones that read as nearly normal locution. "Scarf ace" was far too labored for me. But I'd rather have that hint be a little over the line than crack some blogging whip and treat our readers and Pick-a-Range participants like unruly children.

What I'm even less happy about are the complaints. They strike me as indefensible. Contact me privately if you really think I'm messing up an otherwise pleasant blog experience. Posting a complaint in a comment isn't "please change this" as much as it's "look, look, he's cheating!" It's tattling, and as such, it's far too juvenile for my preference.

Here, then, is my official policy:
  • On hints and jokey or punning references to the answer to the puzzle: Don't let me see you doing it. They should read like plausibly benign comments. Ross and I reserve the right to remove any comment that is deliberately trying to give the game away.
  • On complaints about hints: Complain to me privately and I'll consider your position. Complain on the comments form, and I'll ignore you. Ross and I reserve the right to remove any comment that is evidence of a whiny nature or bad sportsmanship.
  • On juvenile behavior generally: Don't make me stop blogging because I'm no longer having fun.
  • On common sense: If you don't like the comments, don't read them. If you still want to play Pick-a-Range, email me [magdalen (at) crosswordman (dot) com] with your range and I'll do my best to give you that range or the nearest I can come to that range, allowing for picks that preceded the time you posted your email.
We clear? Excellent. Moving on.

The photos, it turns out, are all of New York City. Al Pacino's Wiki page is curiously devoid of place names. In fact, I had to infer "Central Park" from his performances in Shakespeare in the Park.

East Harlem, where Pacino was born
South Bronx, where Pacino grew up.
Entrance to the Bronx Zoo, close to where Pacino lived
Hell's Kitchen, location of the Actors Studio
Central Park #1
Central Park #2

Time for...
Here are this week's picks:

Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550 -- David
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700 -- skydiveboy
701 - 750
751 - 800 -- Curtis
801 - 850
851 - 900 -- Paul
901 - 950
951 - 1,000 -- Magdalen

1,001 - 1,050 -- Dave
1,051 - 1,100 -- HenryBW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- Ross
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850 -- Tobias Duncan
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,050 -- Joe Kupe
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 + new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Good. Now I can put in all the "baaa"d jokes I had to suppress earlier in the week.

Henry BW

PS: Can I prove that I am not a robot? The Turing test is both subjective and probabilistic.

Paul said...

As I understand it, the "Turing test" doesn't prove anything, but may help weed out spambots and may facililtate the digitalization of 'muddy' text.
A work in progress.
One of the words I had to type in last Sunday was BIPOLAR.....ironic, or what?

DaveJ said...

Henry BW: ah, but could you pass the Voight-Kampff ?