Sunday, June 10, 2012

NPR Puzzle 6/10/12 - The Hot Seat

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Name something to sit on. Divide the letters of this exactly in half. Move the second half to the front, without changing the order of any letters. The result will name some things seen on computers. What are they?
Ross just got this, which is a good thing, because it makes the Photos so much easier to do when I know the answer. Given that it took us 45 minutes (and we cheat!), would this be considered a hard puzzle?

Well, you would know because you've solved it. And sent your answer into NPR using this form right here.

Photos. Okay, clearly the answers to this week's NPR puzzle are anagrams of each other. If you take a single letter out, you can anagram the remainder. The photos all have that third, one-letter-shorter, anagram in their Flickr info. (And if you're playing at home, it's not the fish.)







Time for...

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.

Just over 1,200 entries this week. We have a winner! Dave has won again. (We have your address, Dave, so your puzzle book will go out this week.) If anyone else wants a prize, pick a range for the number of entries to be announced next Sunday on the radio. Who knows, you might be right.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print. 

7 comments:

David said...

I got it quickly without cheating, so I think not that hard, but I'll go back to 1001 to 1050 anyway.

I'm vacationing on the Outer Banks (NC). It's very different dealing with the puzzler on the "wrong" coast.

Curtis said...

I'll plop myself down on my usual range of 1,351 - 1,400.

Anonymous said...

Pretty easy this week; usually I have to sit on it for awhile...

Mendo Jim said...

We learned a few weeks ago with the Hamlet quote that at least 3000folks make an effort listen to the Puzzle (or at least not turn it off) and may work on an answer.
I can't figure out if that "challenge" was either the easiest one in years or just one that everybody wanted to participate in.

Last week and this, the answers have the quality of a limited number of possibilities, i.e. only fifty capitals or things to sit on.

There is no reason there shouldn't be over 5000 correct submissions, so I'll take 601-650.

Often in the past there were single posers that took more time to solve than the last ten or more together (and required pen and paper).

skydiveboy said...

1803

Dave said...

Got this one in the nick of time, thanks to a clue from a lawyer. What a mitzvah! I'll try to keep my one week win streak going with a guess of 501-550.

Marie said...

I still can't get it but I can pick a range! 701-750