Thursday, June 28, 2012

NPR Puzzle 6/24/12 - Shove That Stack of Chips Over the Goal Line!

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:

Think of a familiar three-word phrase that might be used in poker and add an "E" at the end and you'll get a two-word phrase that's common in football. What phrases are these? (The spaces in between the words changes in the two phrases but the letters stay in the same order.)
I was surprised with the comments that so many of you claim not to have heard of the poker term (GO ALL IN). But that's okay, the football term (GOAL LINE) is pretty ubiquitous.

We had some interesting comments in the Comments from Sunday, all about whether hinting on this blog (or Blaine's blog) can actually affect the number of NPR entries. Such an affect would be relevant for our Pick a Range contestants. We *used* to have Google Analytics set up for this blog, but Ross has informed me that it got "broken" or something and there's no way to turn it back on retroactively.

So I can't test out the theory, namely that with the very hard NPR puzzles, more people come looking here or at Blaine's blog (or other blogs that discuss the NPR puzzle, if there are other blogs), get the hint(s) that help and thus send in a correct entry for a puzzle they couldn't have solved otherwise. I figured if last week's Sunday post had significantly more hits, that could support the theory. Ross is turning analytics back on, so if the Puzzlemaster would kindly hit us with another bear of a puzzle, we will see what we can see.

Photos. The football photos were pretty obvious, even if it's the "wrong" sort of football in two of the three pictures. (I love the University of Michigan Law School gargoyle!!) But how many of you figured out the poker photos? Two of them are of Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska, the largest land-based rocket range in the U.S. The final photo is of red-hot pokers, a flower that (I learned when I looked for it on Wiki) is an environmental weed in Australia. You can click on the photos for more information; the one of the red hot pokers was taken at Sissinghurst, the famous gardens in Sussex established by Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicholson, so these very specific red hot pokers are not noxious weeds. (You're welcome; I know you worry.)








Time for...
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- Natasha
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150 -- Dave
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300 -- Ross
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450 -- Marie
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- David
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 -- skydiveboy
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250 -- Magdalen
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 + new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

2 comments:

Marie said...

I was surprised too that some folks had not heard the term "go all in." But then realized it's because I have young adult sons who play a lot of Texas Hold'em that the phrase has become so familiar to me.

Curtis said...

Google Analytics is an interesting application. I use it on my site (www.curtisjohnsonimages.com), and I can see how many visitors I get, what operating system and browser they use, the search terms or referring website that brought them to the site, and where they are located. So, when I get a visitor from Brazil using Safari on a Mac searching for an image of a Sentimental Floribundis rose, I can see that information.