Thursday, July 26, 2012

Dogs on Clay Courts: A Racing Racket!

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:

Name a sport in two words — nine letters in the first word, six letters in the last — in which all six vowels (A, E, I, O, U, and Y) are used once each. What is it?
We're in Anaheim after two nights in Santa Barbara. Luckily, by the time we'd unraveled all the mistakes (some mine, some NPR's) in the way we understood the puzzle, we hit on two answers: the wrong one (CLAY-COURT TENNIS) and the right one (GREYHOUND RACING).

I bollixed up the photo section pretty egregiously. I had thought it was 9, 5 and used the five common vowels (but not Y), so I'd come up with porcupine balls which sounds rude but in fact are either a type of meat ball, or those executive stress-reliever toys with silicon "bristles" all over.


A porcupine at the mall!




I am assured that the animal is a porcupine. I don't blame the photographer from getting any closer!

Click on the photo for a recipe for Porcupine Meatballs!

Time for...


Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- Magdalen
851 - 900 -- KDW
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150 -- Dave
1,151 - 1,200 -- Ross
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- skydiveboy
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 -- Marie
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 + new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

1 comment:

KDW said...

Nothing to do with Puzzle Past or Puzzle Future, but: Magdalen, I again want to wish you good luck at tonight's awards ceremony. I'm looking forward to checking out the RWA site tomorrow as much as I'm looking forward to hearing/reading/possibly-comparing-versions-of Will's new puzzle!

Thanks to you and Ross for this fun site.