Sunday, July 29, 2012

NPR Puzzle 7/29/12 - Elemental Entertainer

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of the last name of a famous person in entertainment. The first two letters of this name are a symbol for one of the elements on the periodic table. Substitute the name of that element for the two letters, and you will describe the chief element of this person's work. What is it?
Ross got this immediately, before I'd even summoned up a mental image of the periodic chart. I think his odd amalgam of British cryptic puzzle experience and American crossword facility came in handy. If that's a hint, so be it.

I didn't win the Golden Heart, but the person I predicted would win did! I was sitting next to a Famous Romance Author who was up for two RITAs (the award for best book in various categories) and she lost in both categories but was pleased she had correctly guessed the winner each time. I knew what she meant. Also, in my case, the winner is a friend and truly deserves it. So it's all good.

I'll do photos later; we're in an airport at the moment. But feel free to comment with your Pick-a-Range choices.

14 comments:

David said...

I'm with Ross. I had the answer before NPR was on to the next segment. I'll go with 1001 to 1050, again.

Curtis said...

It took me maybe 30 seconds with a list of the elements to figure this one out. I'll go with 1,351 - 1,400.

Dave said...

Did anybody catch how many correct entries there were this week?

Curtis said...

I think they said somewhere around 500 correct entries.

skydiveboy said...

451

Marie said...

So dang easy, but so was last week, I thought. Staying with 1601.

Dave said...

Around 500 entries? That's ridiculously low. This one is pretty elementary, so I'll go with 900.

Dave said...

Make that 851 to 900.

Mendo Jim said...

I haven't been much of a fan of this famous person's main outlets, but have been entertained by him/her/it.
The challenge is cute word play, but the "chief element of it" is that, IMHO, it may not be the chief element of the person's work.

Oh, well.

I'll try guess this week: 751-800

Curtis said...

I agree, Jim, that the word in question is not the chief element of his/her/it's work. I believe the on-air wording was ever-so-slightly different, something to the effect of "an element of this person's work."

KDW said...

May I have 1651-1700, please?

Mendo Jim said...

Curtis:

Good catch.

Will uses the words "a major," not "the chief" element in the transcript.
The NPR website uses "chief,"
as do Blaine, Renner and our gracious hosts.

This dilutes my complaint, but gives us a new challenge: Will Will mention it next week?

Mendo Jim said...

Interesting that the first three letters of the famous person's first name are an element whose symbol is the first two letters of the famous person's most famous venue.

It seems to me that neither "symbol" nor "abbreviation" are really good terms for the 1 and 2 letter stand-ins for the elements.

Magdalen tells us her adventures, so I'll mention that my granddaughter surprised me with tickets for tommorow's SF Giants game. Gonna take the ferry down the bay to AT&T Park. Whoopee!

Joe Kupe said...

351 to 400 please. Struggled with this a few days so I am not thinking as many folks out there got it. I think the person's work is more dry than the element and answer.