Thursday, August 23, 2012

NPR Puzzle 8/19/12 - We Are The Tealess Match Points

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name the winning play in a certain sport: two words, five letters in each word. These two words share exactly one letter. Drop this letter from both words. The remaining eight letters can be rearranged to name the person who makes this winning play. What person is it?
You can almost imagine the creator of this puzzle, Ken Rudy, watching Andy Murray winning the gold medal in tennis at the Olympics and thinking, "Hunh. Match point...Champion...Time to email Will Shortz!"

That's the answer, by the way: CHAM (from MATCH - T) and PION (from POINT - T).

One of the nice things about Ross being an ex-pat from the U.K. and a naturalized citizen of the U.S. is that he got to celebrate all the gold medals for both countries, including tennis.

Photos. The first two have CHAMPION in their descriptions (Champion Mine and Champion, NY); then MATCH (match stick lichen and the ruins of a Diamond Match Company site) and POINT (a different lichen, but photographed at Point Lobos, CA, and Point de Chateaux, Guadeloupe.) Click on any of the photos for more information.








Time for...
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- musettesmom
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- Mendo Jim
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- HenryBW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 -- Magdalen
1,251 - 1,300 -- skydiveboy
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900 -- Ross
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050 -- Joe Kupe
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 + new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

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