Thursday, August 30, 2012

NPR Puzzle 8/26/12 - Chopin's Nose Grew With Every Etude

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Take the name of a popular children's character in nine letters. Several of its letters appear more than once in the name. Remove every duplication of a letter, so every letter that remains appears just once. This new set of letters can be rearranged to name a famous classical composer. Who is it?
This one wasn't hard unless, like us, you made it hard. I believe the intended means of solution was simply to think of PINOCCHIO and then think of CHOPIN. Or you could take the long way round, the way we did!

What was tricky this week, I gather, was the effort of sending in your entry into NPR. Thanks to Hansi Lo Wang, Producer at NPR, for stopping by with his assurance that the form was, finally, working again.

Photos: I looked at the Wiki pages for The Adventures of Pinocchio, Chopin, and Will Shortz. No one wanted to guess whose photos were whose, so read the captions.

This stunning photo (click on it for attribution) is of Crawfordsville, IN, Will Shortz's birthplace, although not precisely this spot, one imagines...

I cleverly picked a photo more reminiscent of northern European cities, but in fact this is Florence, the "birthplace" of The Adventures of Pinocchio, in that Carlo Collodi wrote it here.

This is Żelazowa Wola, Chopin's birthplace in Poland. (Again, I'm not suggesting these men were born in actual lakes & streams...)

Tuscany, an area of Italy mentioned however tangentially in the Pinocchio article. (Really? I just like infinity pools.)

University of Virginia law school, Will Shortz's alma mater, although he never took the bar exam.

Belweder Palace, where a young Chopin charmed the Grand Duke Constantine by playing the piano.

Time for...
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700 -- skydiveboy
701 - 750
751 - 800 -- Ross
801 - 850 -- Magdalen
851 - 900 -- Curtis
901 - 950 -- Dave
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- HenryBW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 -- Joe Kupe
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- Marie
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 + new record. -- Mendo Jim
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

No comments: