Thursday, September 27, 2012

NPR Puzzle 9/23/12 And Now a Footnote From Our Sponsor

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name two parts of the human body. Put them together one after the other. Change the 7th letter in the result to the next letter of the alphabet to name something that's often found in books. What is it?
I should have gotten this sooner, but what can I say. I don't use footnotes in my fiction.

Anyone guess our photo section bibliophile? It was William Ewart Gladstone. He was the Victorian prime minister who would walk the streets of London seeking out prostitutes to rescue and rehabilitate. Quite unseemly behavior for a politician--the walking on the streets part, I mean--but I, for one, believe Gladstone did not actually cavort with the prostitutes he claimed to help. I'm not sure he helped them, either, but his protestations of sexual innocence ring true.

Oh, right, and he collected books.

Speaking of books, here's a great Banned Books Banner:


You can click through to the Flickr page and see if you can identify all the books. One's missing--they used the top 100 books banned between 1990 and 2000--but it wasn't a title I recognized. Seriously, some of these books are REALLY BENIGN. Wow, makes you wonder.

Time for...
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000 -- Ross
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150 -- Henry BW
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450 -- Magdalen
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- EKW
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 -- Marie
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750 -- KDW
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000 -- skydiveboy
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 + new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

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