Sunday, September 23, 2012

NPR Puzzle 9/23/12 - Would a Bookworm Count?

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name two parts of the human body. Put them together one after the other. Change the 7th letter in the result to the next letter of the alphabet to name something that's often found in books. What is it?
Not hard for Ross, and I have a day's worth of driving yesterday to blame for my inability to focus. (Not really; I just didn't see it.)

You've seen it and have the answer ready, of course, so why not send it in to NPR using their cunning form here.

I have to admit, when I think of the expression, "something you might find in a book," I think of a reader (specifically me) although that imagery works less well with digital book readers. "Get Lost in a Book" is a famous ad campaign by the American Library Association. And who gets lost in books? Bookworms.

For our photo section, I've selected some places that feature in the biography of a famous bibliographer. You can click on all the photos to see where they were taken. Can you figure out who it is from the photos, though? (N.B. Blogger alphabetizes the photos so they're not in a chronological order for the famous bookworm's life.)







Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.
There were fewer than 1500 entries this week, which means that I came close, which counts not at all. You can do better! Send in your guess, surmise, or elaborately calculated approximation!
Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

9 comments:

Curtis said...

This one is almost as easy as last week. But, alas, I blew way past the correct number with that guess. So, I'll trim it down to 1,351 - 1,400.

skydiveboy said...

1951

David said...

A literary(?) clue: Jasper Fforde.

Mendo Jim said...

Well, they didn't mention getting my $1 bet; I guess I'll let it ride.

Does it seem that Will's remuneration package from NPR should be public knowledge? It is a public, listener (us) supported business after all.

To be blunt, the last several "challenges" have been two-bit efforts and a pay range much above that is perhaps excessive.
I think I have spent about ten minutes solving the last four.

The low participation of Will's million listeners can only be from lack of interest, not from trouble of solution.

I loved that this week's contestant has a longer connection with the Times' Crossword than Dr. Pmaster.

David said...

This one took me about 3/4 of a mile on my morning run, the last 1/4 mile after telling my spouse (who collaberated with me).

I'll take the 1001 to 1050 range, please, because it's tradition.

EKW said...

Let's try 1501-1550.

Anonymous said...

My usual 1051-1100, please. Henry BW

KDW said...

Thanks for the Trivial Pursuit puzzle book. It vividly reminded me why I avoid (as much as possible) certain categories in the TP board game.

May I have the 1701-1750 range, please?

Marie said...

Easy-peasy as our hostess might say, 1601 please.