Sunday, September 30, 2012

NPR Puzzle 9/30/12 True is Not the Opposite of Mute

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of a word in which the second letter is R. Change the R to an M, and rearrange the result. You'll get the opposite of the original word. What is it? (Hint: The two words start with the same letter.)
We don't have this yet. I'll endeavor to craft a wonderful post without the answer. (Psst, hurry up, Ross!)

Of course, you didn't have any trouble solving it and you've already clicked through to the handy NPR form for submitting the answer.

Hah! I solved it before Ross did. Bragging rights ALL DAY! Oh, wait, there's a flag on the play. Ross is claiming my answer isn't the right answer. Whatever.

Ross predicts moaning and groaning from the usual suspects (we're looking at you, Mendo Jim), so remember the rules: don't hint so I notice.

Okay, photos. So what I did was look in Wiki for one of these words. Then I noodled around until I thought, "Ooh, I like [insert place name here]" for reasons I can't say. That took me to a particular person's Wiki page, and from there I scrounged some photos...that, really, have nothing to do with the puzzle except that they look pretty and I want to go there.







Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.
There were more than 1100 entries this week, which means that Henry won. Because he's very nearly family, we'll pick something out and give it to him when he next visits. (Thanksgiving?) For non-family members, we'll mail it out. Honest! Send in your favorite range and see if you can win.
Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

9 comments:

KDW said...

Is it possible that I've solved this puzzle already? My word!

May I please have the 851-900 range?

Mendo Jim said...

Moaning and groaning about these challenges is not a vice.

I will give this week's $1 entry to anyone who can find a giveaway hint in any of my posts here over the years.

This week one has to wonder what it would take to make Will understand that the "opposite" words he wants are not really equivalent.
A corallary task would be what it would take to convince a newcomer that this is just the way things are here.

Curtis said...

I'll admit I haven't gotten this one yet, which is an interesting change of pace, considering I haven't spent more than five minutes on the puzzle in weeks. So, I'll go with 351 - 400.

skydiveboy said...

301

David said...

I still don't have the answer. 1001 to 1050, please.

Curtis said...

@David - don't feel bad about not having it. I submitted an answer that might work, but I'm not 100% sure of it. But, I don't have the time to pursue it further.

Marie said...

I have an answer--maybe. I'll take 401.

EKW said...

I have a five letter answer thanks to a comment ken posted on Blaine's blog.
It certainly seems to fit. I will try
501-550.

Joe Kupe said...

I had that five letter word answer but then a friend ran a java program and conivnced me otherwise! 101 - 150 please.