Thursday, December 6, 2012

NPR Puzzle 12/2/12 - Will Socked It To Us One More Time

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name two articles of apparel — things you wear — which, when the words are used as verbs, are synonyms of each other. What are they?
Okay. Here's what we said about this puzzle back in 2009:
This was the puzzle to be solved:
Take "tire" and "exhaust." They're both things a car has. But as verbs, in a non-car sense, they're synonyms. The challenge is to name two articles of apparel, things to wear, each with 4 letters, and as verbs, in a non-apparel sense, the two words are synonyms. What words are they?
The answer, I'm fairly certain, is SOCK and BELT, as in to hit. Although the immensely clever xwd_fiend suggested on Ross's Facebook page CAPS and TOPS, both meaning "exceeds." This probably doesn't work, as Will has specified that they should be two articles of apparel, which strongly indicates that each is an individual piece of clothing.

I got "sock" immediately, but had to look for a synonym for "hit" to see that the other piece of clothing was "belt." Ross also got "sock" immediately, but didn't think of "belt" until I told him that he was wearing one . . . and even then I had to get him to raise his shirt and look at his waist! My excuse is that I never ever wear belts. His excuse is that he is brain dead after all the work he does on the NY Times crossword puzzles.

Another suggestion on Ross's Facebook page was "sock" and "sack," also from xwd_fiend. Now, his explanation about "sack" is that Chambers will allow it on its own as meaning a sack dress. But, really, any woman reading this knows that the expression, "she'd look good in anything -- even a burlap sack" is figurative. A sack dress is a sack dress; a sack is a sack. Chambers don't do fashion!
*sigh* I don't feel like I've been blogging about this puzzle for so long that this isn't embarrassing. I mean, really, this wasn't back in the "postcard" era or anything.

I sent in a puzzle for Dr. Shortz. I've checked. I'm pretty sure it hasn't been used yet. We'll see if it gets used at all. (If he doesn't use it for six months--and if I can remember it--I'll let you guys play with it.)

More socks! Click on any photo to get more information.






Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000 -- Paul
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500 -- Ross

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850 -- Magdalen
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000 -- KDW
2,001 - 2,050 -- Dave
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250 -- Marie
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400 -- Curtis
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250 -- Jan
3,251 - 3,500 -- skydiveboy
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

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