Thursday, December 27, 2012

NPR Puzzle - 12/23/12 -- The Heartbreak Kid's "Classical" Puzzle

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Take the last name of a famous actor. Drop the first letter, and you'll get the last name of a famous artist. Drop the first letter again, and you'll get the name of a god in classical mythology. What names are these?
Is so well-understood that "classical" mythology is only Roman and Greek mythology, with the possible inclusion of pre-Ptolemic Egyptian mythology thrown in for good measure? If so, then Mendo Jim is right and Dr. Will Shortz is wrong. Because the god in question is ODIN from the Northern European pantheon. The actor is Charles GRODIN and the artist is French sculptor Auguste RODIN.

I hope everyone had a wonderful Tuesday, whether it was a sacred or commercial holiday, or no holiday at all.

Oh, and Paul pointed out that one of the humans won an award in one of the places I had photos. Did you mean, Paul, Rodin won an award at the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago? Or the award that Charles Grodin won in Valladolid?

Now that all can be revealed, here are some new & different photos:

Charles Grodin

This building was used for Charles Grodin's character's office in Dave

The Rodin Museum in Philadelphia (love this building)

Le Penseur II in Paris

The Flickr page suggests this is an adaptation of Odin, Anthony Hopkins' character in the movie Thor

It sounds like a joke, but Odin, Hone & Lodur walk into a wood. They find two trees without spirits, so they jazz them up. This is Ask (ash).
Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200 -- Ross
201 - 250 -- Marie
251 - 300 -- Joe Kupe
301 - 350 -- skydiveboy
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- KDW
451 - 500 -- Magdalen
 
501 - 550 -- Laura
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750 -- Paul
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- Dave
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

5 comments:

Joe Kupe said...

We had Grodin, Rodin, Odin, but our alternate was Gerald Brodin. He is an actor and may be famous in his mother's eye!

Mendo Jim said...

Musty?

Paul said...

Pleeease don't tell me that thing in the upper left quadrant of the last photo is an askteris.....pleeease!

skydiveboy said...

Do you mean: ASTERISK?

Paul said...

No, sdb, I meant exactly what I typed, but thanks for inquiring.
Actually, I was stalling for time while I contemplated the remaining Sunday photos.
#2 does pertain to the Chicago World's Fair, and I guess Rodin was an exhibitor, but I don't really know if he won anything.
#3 seems to be a burgher's-eye view of something or other.
#4 might depict the bar O,H,&L walked into, but I doubt it.
#5 is a pretty picture of Grodin's home town. I was there, once, a long time ago, but all I remember are slag heaps and lots of signs with the Westinghouse emblam(sic) on them. Maybe John Fogerty was right about the way to see the good side of a city.
#6 still has me puzzled. By rights (or at least by the numbers) it should belong to Odin. It does appear to bear his initial, but I doubt that the edifice was dedicated to him.