Sunday, January 29, 2012

NPR Puzzle 1/29/12 - The Line Up

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Write the digits from 1 to 9 in a line. If you put a plus sign after the 2, a times sign after the 4, and plus signs after the 6 and 8, the line shows 12 + 34 x 56 + 78 + 9, which equals 2003. That's nine years off from our current year 2012. This example uses four arithmetic symbols. The object is to use just three of the following arithmetic operations: addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, in a line from 1 to 9 to get 2012 exactly. The operations should be performed in order from left to right. There are no tricks to this puzzle. Can you do it?
Well, we think we can. We just haven't yet. Check back on Thursday...

If you solved it, I know you were smart enough to submit your answer at the correct NPR form.

It's me (Magdalen) again. Ross did a wonderful job filling in for me while I was away in Maine for my MFA program, and then I got even more time off thanks to the Twenty-Fifth Anniversary gap last Sunday. But I'm glad to be back now. Of course I am. ;-)

Photos of numbers are easy; let's see if I can get some arithmetic symbols...and the answer is no (or at least I can't figure out how you find them). So here are some numbers, starting with 12:34:56 on 7/8/09:






I assure you, if any of those numbers are in the final answer, it's purely coincidental!

Time for...
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.

This week, there were 580 entries; you were ALL winners, in one sense of the word. (In another sense, all but one of you were losers. Sorry.)  Alas, no one won the Pick a Range for last week. (I think. I reserve the right to edit this if I heard the number wrong.)

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print. 

Thursday, January 26, 2012

NPR Puzzle 1/15/12 - American Idol

Although Magdalen's been back in circulation a few days, this is Crossword Man finishing up where I left off two Sundays ago, with my thoughts on this NPR "creative" challenge:
Combine the titles of some TV shows, past or present, into an amusing sentence or statement. For example: "TODAY / SISTERS / NAME THAT TUNE / FATHER KNOWS BEST," "DESPERATE HOUSEWIVES / BEWITCHED / MY THREE SONS / ONE DAY AT A TIME," "I'VE GOT A SECRET / MURDER, SHE WROTE / THE F.B.I." Entries will be judged on their sense, naturalness of syntax, humor, originality, familiarity of the TV shows named, and overall effect. No more than three sentences per entry, please.
Some commenters prefer the puzzles with a definite answer, but I recall these challenges have been popular in the past. I'm definitely going to aim high in the Pick a Range this week.

Great to hear the 10-minute special for the 25th anniversary of the NPR Sunday Puzzle: we sometimes moan and groan about certain of Will Shortz's ideas, but overall The NPR Sunday Puzzle is one of America's Most Venerable Institutions, which we should all be proud of. Will's stamina calls to mind that of the British crossword compiler Jonathan Crowther, who has been cranking out the amazing Azed cryptic for over 35 years and is now well past number 2000 in that series.

Magdalen and I tried to come up with some example sentences and found the lack of verbs troublesome, but then we didn't look outside Time's Top 100 TV Shows. Here's the best we did:
  • Wiseguy / lost / the office / soap
  • Six feet under / second city, television / roots / lost / 24/60 minutes
  • The honeymooners / see it now: / sex! ... and the city / cheers
Let us know what you came up with.

Here are the answers to my picture/number puzzles:

Roots
Leave It To Beaver

Cheers

M*A*S*H

Lost

7  123423478763639
The Odd Couple

2 3 5 7 11 13 17 19 23 29 31 37 39?
Prime Suspect


Time for ...
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250 -- Marie
251 - 300
301 - 350 -- Skydiveboy
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- Joe Kupe
451 - 500 -- Magdalen
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800 -- Ross
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Sunday, January 15, 2012

NPR Puzzle 1/15/12 - Willin' to be Illin'

This is Crossword Man blogging for Magdalen again. The hot news is that she is driving home later today, a day earlier than expected (yay!). M will take over the NPR blog posts from when the next puzzle is read out on air.

So I managed to guess the right answer to last week's NPR puzzle without realizing it, although I didn't get bumper as the six-letter term, it being unaccountably absent from the Bowler's Paradise glossary. The problem with a puzzle like this is that the terminology associated with very popular games isn't clearly defined, making it hard for those not aficionados.

As they said on the show, a difficult puzzle. An interesting and welcome development is that the total number of entries (230) and number deemed correct (almost 140) were announced. I forget now if we award Pick a Range prizes based on the total or correct entries, but happily both figures fall into gaps in the guesses ... no prize today.

If you haven't yet seen The Colbert Report's segment on the wack/illin' kerfuffle, here it is:


This week's NPR puzzle is one of their occasional "creative" ones, since Something Is Afoot for next Sunday's show: congratulations to Weekend Edition Sunday and Will Shortz on their 25th anniversary!
This is a special two-week creative challenge. Combine the titles of some TV shows, past or present, into an amusing sentence or statement. For example: "TODAY / SISTERS / NAME THAT TUNE / FATHER KNOWS BEST," "DESPERATE HOUSEWIVES / BEWITCHED / MY THREE SONS / ONE DAY AT A TIME," "I'VE GOT A SECRET / MURDER, SHE WROTE / THE F.B.I." Entries will be judged on their sense, naturalness of syntax, humor, originality, familiarity of the TV shows named, and overall effect. No more than three sentences per entry, please.
As usual, Submit Your Answer to NPR first, but please share the fruits of your hard work with us when the next post appears after the deadline for entries closes on Thursday January 26. Probably only the winner and one or two runners-up sentences will be read out on air, but we'd like to see everything you creative folks come up with.

Here's a related picture puzzle. Each of these pictures is a clue to one of the top 100 TV shows of all time, as listed by TIME TV critic James Poniewozik. As usual, clicking on the image will take you to the corresponding flickr page, which will tell you the answer:






Here's a final two clued with numbers:

7  123423478763639

2 3 5 7 11 13 17 19 23 29 31 37 39?

Which brings us to ....

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Magdalen and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print. 

Thursday, January 12, 2012

NPR Puzzle 1/8/12 - Skittled

This is Crossword Man again, as Magdalen's still in Maine. Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Name four parts of a car that are also terms used in a particular game. One of the parts is spelled in three letters, two of them in five letters each, and one has six letters. Two places a car might go are also terms used in the game. What game is it, and what are the terms?
Things haven't been going well for me this week: I have to confess to not having an answer for you. Plus Mendo Jim says blogger is playing up and not letting him add a comment ... which might explain why only three ranges have been plucked this week.

Anyway, my best guess at the game is ten-pin bowling, since that has well-known terms that are places a car might go: to wit an alley and a lane. Five-letter bowling terms include spare and frame.

I also thought the three-letter term might be pin - there have got to be pins in a car, right? But that didn't satisfy my sense of esthetic.

It gets worse when you look into the six-letter terms. OK, you can find ones like clutch if you plumb the depths of the online glossaries like the one at Bowler's Paradise. But they're not exactly strongly associated with the game, for anyone who doesn't play it.

So I suspect I've missed this one. On the plus side, I can remember the answer to my own picture puzzle, which is cricket. Here are the pix recaptioned with the relevant cricketing term:

Square leg(s) [fielding position]

Duck [batsman's score of zero]

Nelson [a score of 111, regarded as unlucky]

Googly [a deceptive type of delivery by a spin bowler]

Beamer [a delivery reaching the batsman at head height without bouncing]


Time for ...
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50 -- Ross
 51 - 100 -- Magdalen
101 - 150
151 - 200 -- Dave
201 - 250
251 - 300 -- Skydiveboy
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Sunday, January 8, 2012

NPR Puzzle 1/8/12 - Off One's Game

This is Crossword Man blogging for Magdalen, who is in Freeport, ME, at one of her residencies for the Stonecoast MFA in Creative Writing. She seems to be doing well, but we have relatively little time to chat: the residency periods are few and far between, so the students have to work very long hours when they're on campus.

Anyway, here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Name four parts of a car that are also terms used in a particular game. One of the parts is spelled in three letters, two of them in five letters each, and one has six letters. Two places a car might go are also terms used in the game. What game is it, and what are the terms?
Probably due to Magdalen's absence from the house, I feel I'm off my game today: I've tried all the Usual Suspects in the games world, and found several which the puzzle fits partially. But so far I don't have a satisfying list of all four car parts.

I thought I'd do a few chores before posting in the hopes I'd think of the answer while not thinking of the answer (if you see what I mean) ... but no luck yet. If you've worked out the answer, don't tell me, but Submit Your Answer to NPR. You can show your extreme cleverness to me by solving the puzzle below.

At the risk of getting close to the right answer by accident, here's a picture puzzle for you. Each of these illustrates a term from a game I'm familiar with, as interpreted by Flickr users (clicking on the picture will give you the attribution, and may also help you figure out the answer).






Which brings us to ....

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Magdalen and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.

Last week skydiveboy won again; I'll see if there's anything left in Santa's sack for him. Dang, we're going to have to change those ranges again soon: we're paying out too often and life has to get tougher for you all. The good times will end soon, so send in your picks before the mistress comes home and decides what our all-new right-sized slots are going to be....

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print. 

Thursday, January 5, 2012

NPR Puzzle 1/1/12 -- Anagrams to "Gentlewomen Golf"

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Name certain scores in a certain sport. This is a two-word phrase with a total of 10 letters (5 letters in each word). If you have the right phrase, you can rearrange all the letters to name a different sport, also in two words (6 letters in the first word, 4 in the second). What are the scores, and what is the sport?
I really can't say why it took us so long to get FIELD GOALS, but it did. Like, forever. And, as many people noted in the comments, you can get GOLF out of that pretty quickly, but LADIES GOLF is harder to see. Maybe because it's a bit patronizing.

Yes, Will, it's the Ladies' Professional Golf Association, but that's a bit like referring to the women's athletic team as the "Lady Vols," etc. The team may be known as the "Lady Vols," but the players are women. Similarly, the LPGA may keep the L but I suspect the women who play golf professionally don't think of themselves as "ladies."

And it's arguably not a sport. They play golf. Unless you want to make a big deal out of the fact women play a shorter course, there's no difference between "mens golf" and "ladies golf" such that "ladies golf" is a specific sport.

I'd take a mulligan if I were you, Will.

But I love the opportunity this gave me with the photos. I have my personal favorite LPGA stars, and I went looking at Wiki's list of LPGA Hall of Famers. Click on each name and you get the birthplaces. Any luck even figuring out which continent these places were on?


Saratoga Springs - Dottie Pepper

Guadalajara, Mexico - Lorena Ochoa

Bro, Sweden - Annika Sorenstam

Taoyuan, Taiwan - Yani Tseng

Ayr, Queensland, Australia - Karrie Webb

St. Louis, Missouri - Judy Rankin


Time for ...
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200 -- Ross
201 - 250 -- Skydiveboy
251 - 300 -- Jim (Mendo)
301 - 350 -- itSMF...Barbara
351 - 400 -- EKW
401 - 450 -- Joe Kupe
451 - 500 -- Curtis
 
501 - 550 -- Henry
551 - 600 -- Magdalen
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900 -- Marie
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Sunday, January 1, 2012

NPR Puzzle 1/1/12 - Happy New Sunday Puzzle!

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Name certain scores in a certain sport. This is a two-word phrase with a total of 10 letters (5 letters in each word). If you have the right phrase, you can rearrange all the letters to name a different sport, also in two words (6 letters in the first word, 4 in the second). What are the scores, and what is the sport?
Not immediately obvious, I'll admit. And when we solved it, we weren't...well let's just say we were underwhelmed.

When you've solved it, send your answer in to NPR. Feel free to use this link.

What's up with NPR not even telling us any number associated with last week's puzzle entries? If we find out the number, we'll award the prize retroactively. (Help, Will Shortz--can you get them to amend the puzzle page with the number of correct entries, or entries in general, or any number, really? Thanks.)

Edited to add: Oops, our bad. According to sharp-eared reader skydiveboy, there were more than 300 entries. I hereby retract my request for Will Shortz to do anything. (Sorry, Will. Happy New Year!)

Photos. Now this will be fun. Take the sport (6, 4). Below are photos of the hometowns of some of the people who are good at that sport.








Time for ...

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.
We were so sure we were giving away a prize this week, given that all the juiciest ranges had been taken. AND THEN NO NUMBER IS MENTIONED. Boo-hoo. I've put out a respectful request of Dr. Shortz to see if the Unnamed and Underappreciated Intern can cough up a number to put on the Sunday Puzzle page. If a number appears, we'll send out a prize.

Amazingly, despite both of us listening--and no, neither of us consumed any alcoholic beverages or even slept late--we missed that the number of entries was "more than 300." Which means Joe Kupe is our winner. Joe, if you haven't won before (and I don't have the record book with me) please email me: Magdalen (a) Crosswordman.com to tell me where to send your prize. If you have won before, Ross can give me your address.

See, we weren't feigning deafness to avoid giving out a prize. So send in your picks for next week.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print.