Sunday, April 29, 2012

NPR Puzzle 4/29/12 Coming May 3: Hint-a-palooza!

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name the capital of a country that, when said out loud, sounds like a three-word phrase. This phrase might describe the reason why the police did not catch a barefoot thief. What is the capital, and what is the reason?
Okay, so let's make a deal, shall we? I won't say a single thing about this puzzle (no hints at all) AND I'll make sure that the Thursday post goes up on Thursday (Blogger sucks) so that everyone can rag all they want about this one. In exchange, you guys won't start your hints until later in the week. Because this puzzle does rather invite hints, doesn't it?

But do send your answers in to NPR here.

Photos. Not saying much about these, either.





Time for...

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.

Just under 1,000 entries, which means once again no one won, although Dave got close. (Don't forget to check out his leopard print body paint job here!) No need for camouflage when you submit your guess for the number of entries to be announced next Sunday on the radio! If you guess correctly, you'll win a prize.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print. 

Saturday, April 28, 2012

NPR Puzzle 4/22/12 - Someone Tell Will TYRA is not Common, She's FIERCE

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of a common man's name in four letters, one syllable. Move each letter exactly halfway around the alphabet. For example, A would become N, N would become A, and B would become O. The result will be a common woman's name in two syllables. What names are these?
Oh, Dr. Shortz would be in SO MUCH TROUBLE if it weren't for the minor detail that Tyra Banks probably doesn't know who "the Puzzle Master" is. Because while the less-common single-N spelling of GLEN doesn't make that an uncommon name, there really is only one Tyra, just as there's only one Madonna or one Iman or one Beyoncé. In other words, you can give your child the name Tyra, but it'll be awhile before people stop saying, "Oh, you mean like Tyra Banks."

The reference to "fierce" comes from her TV show, America's Next Top Model. I don't watch it, but I gather it involves telling young attractive women to make pouty faces and angry eyes and call it "fierce."

Admit it, you would love to be a fly on the wall if Tyra Banks came around to Will's home to explain to him what "fierce" looks like.

And speaking of fierce: if you're on Facebook, check out our own "Dave" (not to be confused with "David"), who's running (literally) to win a prize trip to South Africa. He told them he'd paint himself with Leopard spots and run through his neighborhood, so that's what he's done: DAVE IN A SPEEDO VIDEO

For photos, Nothing so exciting. I went with the oh-so-singularly-obvious Tyra Banks and the very-nearly-as-obvious Glen Campbell.

I couldn't find a nice photo of Tyra's hometown, but she moved to LA to studying modeling at an early age, so the train station seemed pretty good.

Similarly, I couldn't find a photo of Glen Campbell's specific birthplace in Arkansas, but as a child he was sent to live with his uncle Dick Bills in Albuquerque, NM.

Tyra Banks did some modelling in Milan, Italy -- where the Duomo is actually taller than the Galleria!

Generically lovely scenery in Arkansas, but I have no clue if this is anywhere near Delight, Glen Campbell's birthplace.

Tyra also modeled in Paris, where occasionally the sky looks really, really interesting.

One of Glen Campbell's biggest hits was "By The Time I Get to Phoenix." This is Phoenix.

Time for...
Here are this week's picks:

Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- skydiveboy
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600 -- Ross
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800 -- Magdalen
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- Dave
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- HenryBW
1,101 - 1,150 -- Jim, Mendo
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750 -- Marie
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 + new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Sunday, April 22, 2012

NPR Puzzle 4/22/12 - Something's Rot-13 in Denmark?

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of a common man's name in four letters, one syllable. Move each letter exactly halfway around the alphabet. For example, A would become N, N would become A, and B would become O. The result will be a common woman's name in two syllables. What names are these?
According to Ross, this cipher is known as Rot-13. Don't ask me why. Maybe when he's not half-asleep he'll be able to explain. Anyway, in order to solve it quickly, he used his clicky fingers and software expertise (yes, even half-asleep) and solved the puzzle.

When you've solved it using a wide-awake noggin, send the answer in here.

We were in Asheville, North Carolina last week. Lovely place. Last time we stayed at a fancy-schmancy bed and breakfast. This time we stayed at a cabin. A very lovely, well-appointed cabin, but still, no High Victoriana in sight. Instead, the deck seemed like a tree-house.  Absolutely lovely...except for the bronchitis I drove down with, and still managed to have on the trip up. Oh, I'm okay, just Wheezy (aka the 8th dwarf).

For photos, I've snitched some places from two famous people's Wiki pages, one guy with the masculine name and one woman with the feminine name. Enjoy!







Time for...

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.

Almost 2000 entries, which means once again no one won and also the number of entries is still going up. Are the puzzles easier? More people listening? You can't tell from our Pick-a-Range entries, which dipped last week. Beef up our numbers this week and submit your guess for the number of entries to be announced next Sunday on the radio and if guess correctly, you'll win a prize.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print. 

Thursday, April 19, 2012

NPR Puzzle 4/15/12 - It's Magic! No, It's the Dickens!

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a famous novel in two words. The first word has five letters, and the second word has 11. If you have the right novel, the initial letters of the novel's title, reversed, are the initials of its author. What's the novel, and who is the author?
Ross is a bit of a Charles Dickens aficionado, so this one was easy. Okay, so I first thought of Great Expectations (5, 12) but then Ross thought of David Copperfield (5, 11) and all was well.

Haven't I done Charles Dickens' Wiki page already? No? It just feels like I have. Anyway, I decided to do David Copperfield's Wiki page. The magician, not the nearly-orphan. (I had to ask Ross if the character was an orphan. I mean, they're all orphans eventually, but I gather DC has a stepfather, for what that's worth.) So here are places from David Copperfield's life, starting with the surprising fact that he was born in Metuchen, NJ:


Metuchen, NJ, David Copperfield's birthplace

Copperfield has levitated over the Grand Canyon

And walked through the Great Wall of China (lower left)

And had a show in Las Vegas (seen here from Henderson)

In 2006, Copperfield bought Musha Cay in the Bahamas from the co-founder of the Blockbuster video chain

West Palm Beach, Florida, where David Copperfield was not robbed at gunpoint. Oh, the gun was there, but he used sleight of hand to hide his possessions from the thieves.

Time for...
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100 -- HenryBW
1,101 - 1,150 -- Jim, Mendo
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300 -- SkyDiveBoy
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500 -- Ross

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600 -- Magdalen
1,601 - 1,650 -- Dave
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750 -- Marie
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,050 -- David
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 + new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Sunday, April 15, 2012

NPR Puzzle 4/15/12 - A Novel Idea

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a famous novel in two words. The first word has five letters, and the second word has 11. If you have the right novel, the initial letters of the novel's title, reversed, are the initials of its author. What's the novel, and who is the author?
Not hard.

If you thought so too, send your answer in to NPR here.

And for photos, it's the same old story: I've selected place names from the relevant person's Wiki page. Enjoy!







Time for...
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.

Just under 1500 entries, which means two things. First, no one won, and second, the number of entries is going back up, presumably because the puzzles are easier. Maybe we will set a new record again... Submit your guess for the number of entries to be announced next Sunday on the radio and if guess correctly, you'll win a prize.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print. 

Thursday, April 12, 2012

NPR Puzzle 4/8/12 - What Will Delaware? A Hijab!

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:

Name an article of clothing that contains three consecutive letters of the alphabet consecutively in the word. For example, "canopy" contains the consecutive letters N-O-P. This article of clothing is often worn in a country that's name also contains three consecutive letters of the alphabet together. What is the clothing article, and what is the country?
We did this the obvious way: look for the country, then figure out the clothing. The countries were easy, but did we want Middle Eastern dress for Afghanistan, or Pacific Islander costumes for Tuvalu? The answer, we think, is HIJAB + AFGHANISTAN. Tuvalu won the consolation prize: photos!

All the photos are of Tuvalu, except the last one, which Flickr says is of the Tuvalu consulate/embassy in the Raynes Park (SW20) area of London. Extra sparkly bonus points if any of you guessed that right!









 Time for...
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600 -- Ross
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- Shieldhouse
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- HenryBW
1,101 - 1,150 -- Marie
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 -- Tobias Duncan
1,251 - 1,300 -- Magdalen
1,301 - 1,350 -- Debbisam
1,351 - 1,400 -- Kathy Dawn
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600 
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,050 -- Jan
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250 -- SkyDiveBoy
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000 -- Joe Kupe

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 + new record. -- EKW
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Sunday, April 8, 2012

NPR Puzzle 4/8/12 - Where do They Wear Labcoats?

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name an article of clothing that contains three consecutive letters of the alphabet consecutively in the word. For example, "canopy" contains the consecutive letters N-O-P. This article of clothing is often worn in a country that's name also contains three consecutive letters of the alphabet together. What is the clothing article, and what is the country?
Well, now, that's an interesting question, and I'm not sure how to answer it. There are articles of Western attire that are worn almost everywhere. On the other hand, there are some pretty obscure items worn in foreign countries. And among those, the names can have alternate spellings, etc. So what are they really looking for?

Okay, I admit it. We don't have an answer yet.

If you're not only smarter than us but faster too, submit your undoubtedly correct answer here: The proper Send Us Your Answer page at NPR.

Ahh. Ross solved it. Having a lot of obscure words stuffed in his head helped. Oops. A hint. Yes, Virginia, the word is obscure. Take that to the bank.

Photos. Hmmm. Not saying why I've picked the photos I've picked. Got that? Not saying. Don't assume you know. These photos may not help you solve the puzzle. They *could* just be a nice place for a spring holiday. Well, except for the last one. That one totally gives the game away. Or not.








 Time for...

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our unspecified choosing.

Over 1300 entries, which means Marie won. Our records suggests this is a first-time win for Marie, And for being such a loyal follower, she gets one of the better prizes. Send your address to me, Marie, so I can mail that out. Magdalen (at) CrosswordMan (dot) com. And the rest of you know the drill: Submit your guess for the number of entries to be announced next Sunday on the radio and maybe you'll win a prize for better or worse.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print.