Sunday, July 29, 2012

NPR Puzzle 7/29/12 - Elemental Entertainer

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of the last name of a famous person in entertainment. The first two letters of this name are a symbol for one of the elements on the periodic table. Substitute the name of that element for the two letters, and you will describe the chief element of this person's work. What is it?
Ross got this immediately, before I'd even summoned up a mental image of the periodic chart. I think his odd amalgam of British cryptic puzzle experience and American crossword facility came in handy. If that's a hint, so be it.

I didn't win the Golden Heart, but the person I predicted would win did! I was sitting next to a Famous Romance Author who was up for two RITAs (the award for best book in various categories) and she lost in both categories but was pleased she had correctly guessed the winner each time. I knew what she meant. Also, in my case, the winner is a friend and truly deserves it. So it's all good.

I'll do photos later; we're in an airport at the moment. But feel free to comment with your Pick-a-Range choices.

Thursday, July 26, 2012

Dogs on Clay Courts: A Racing Racket!

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:

Name a sport in two words — nine letters in the first word, six letters in the last — in which all six vowels (A, E, I, O, U, and Y) are used once each. What is it?
We're in Anaheim after two nights in Santa Barbara. Luckily, by the time we'd unraveled all the mistakes (some mine, some NPR's) in the way we understood the puzzle, we hit on two answers: the wrong one (CLAY-COURT TENNIS) and the right one (GREYHOUND RACING).

I bollixed up the photo section pretty egregiously. I had thought it was 9, 5 and used the five common vowels (but not Y), so I'd come up with porcupine balls which sounds rude but in fact are either a type of meat ball, or those executive stress-reliever toys with silicon "bristles" all over.


A porcupine at the mall!




I am assured that the animal is a porcupine. I don't blame the photographer from getting any closer!

Click on the photo for a recipe for Porcupine Meatballs!

Time for...


Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- Magdalen
851 - 900 -- KDW
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150 -- Dave
1,151 - 1,200 -- Ross
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- skydiveboy
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 -- Marie
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 + new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, July 22, 2012

Sporting Life

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Name a sport in two words — nine letters in the first word, five six letters in the last — in which all six vowels (A, E, I, O, U, and Y) are used once each. What is it?
We're at the Philadelphia Airport and I've sent Ross and Henry off to solve the puzzle and eat breakfast (in that order) while I blog. (They were only half-successful: they got breakfast but didn't solve the puzzle yet.)

As you did not have to get up at 4:00 a.m., I assume you solved the puzzle with dispatch and you can send it in to NPR using this form here.

Photos:

I my search for Dr. Shortz's sport I found an anatomical term that almost meets the parameters of the puzzle. (As it was SUPER EARLY, I missed the addition of the Y.)

All photos relate to that term. See if you can figure it out. And by "figure it out" I mean either discern what 9, 5 phrase with AEIOU might be that relates to the photos, or add a Y to the end to get a joky adverbial phrase in 9, 6. Or ignore the whole thing and just admire the photos. :-)







As previously explained, Pick-a-Range will be added later. (Yes, later even than right now.) You can go ahead and pick your range now, but it will be several hours before we can congratulate the winner from last week.

Time for...


This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.

I believe the entries were announced as "about 1,100". In this instance, Henry BW is the winner. But the Tie-Break Rule is officially no longer obsolete. Because the actual number of entries is some number near the round number announced (this week, it could have been 1,089 or 1,103) the winner could be the person picking 1,051 to 1,100 or the other person picking 1,101 to 1,150. We want new players to win prizes (it sucks them in, uh, encourages them to come back) so we're going to abide by the spirit of the Old Tie Break Rule, which has been revised (see below). Luckily, Curtis graciously withdrew his claim to the prize last week, so it's been dispatched to KDW, who had not previously won. If the on-air announcer actually says, "We received 1,100 entries," thus implying that 1,100 is the specific number of entries received, then we'll give it to the person who picked 1,051-1,100.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Saturday, July 21, 2012

Delays in Transmission

Hi! Magdalen here, back from my MFA residency (amazingly educational, as always) but already en route to California for the Romance Writers of America National conference. As a result of our travel plans, it may be a while before we can post our usual Sunday post. Please be patient with us and come back later to see what photos I've collected for you.

(There is a slim possibility that I'll be able to post something quick-and-dirty before the actual radio broadcast. If that happens, I'll edit it later to add the Pick-a-Range results.)

Thursday, July 19, 2012

NPR Puzzle 7/15/12 -- Eye Rhymes

This should be your last dose of Crossword Man in a while, as Magdalen takes over with the next post. Our answer to last Sunday's NPR Puzzle:
The name of something that you might see your doctor about is a two-word phrase. Three letters in each word. When these six letters are written without a space, a three-letter word can be removed from inside, and the remaining three letters in order also form a word. What's interesting is that the four three-letter words — the two in the original phrase, the one that was removed, and the one that remains — all rhyme. What is the original phrase?
is dry eye, which I doubted was an actual medical condition ... but Wikipedia has just proved me wrong. Take rye out from the inside and you are left with dye. dry, rye and dye all rhyme with eye.

But these are oddly enough not eye rhymes, which I wanted to riff on last Sunday. Since I couldn't do so without giving too much away, I've left it till today. Before getting on to that, we're curious about the alternative answers that Seth and Skydiveboy mentioned in comments. Please spill.

In trying to solve this puzzle, I kept coming across (3,3) phrases in which the two parts look like they ought to rhyme but don't ... e.g. cut out and put out. Especially when used in poetry, these are known as eye rhymes, as in the last couplet of Ode to the West Wind:
The trumpet of a prophecy! O Wind,
If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind?
I thought I'd have no difficulty choosing a lot more phrases with eye rhymes, but they are actually rather uncommon. Each picture below illustrates a (4,4) phrase, in which the last three letters of each word in the phrase are the same, but don't rhyme. One of these is WAY more obvious than the others, so I've chosen an unusual context in the hope of making the puzzle harder. Drag the text between the square brackets to see the answers, and click on the image for the attribution:

[COME HOME]
[HAND WAND]
[GOOD MOOD]
[FOUR HOUR]
[SEAN BEAN]

Time for...
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- skydiveboy
451 - 500 -- Ben
 
501 - 550
551 - 600 -- Ross
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750 -- Magdalen
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- Marie
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- KDW
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 + new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Sunday, July 15, 2012

NPR Puzzle 7/15/12 - Rag Bag

Magdalen's Stonecoast MFA residency isn't quite over yet, so this is Ross again to blog for you. And I should warn all our readers that the rest of the July is going to be a bit weird: the next two Sundays are travel days for us and when we'll find time to solve let alone talk at length about puzzles, I don't know.

In case you've forgotten, Magdalen's in the spotlight: her unpublished novel Blackjack and Moonlight is one of the finalists in the Contemporary Single Title category of the 2012 Romance Writers of America® (RWA) Golden Heart® contest. We'll find out the winner in Anaheim on Saturday July 28. Good luck Magdalen!

So to this week's NPR Puzzle, from National Puzzlers' League member David Rosen in honor of their 2012 convention:
The name of something that you might see your doctor about is a two-word phrase. Three letters in each word. When these six letters are written without a space, a three-letter word can be removed from inside, and the remaining three letters in order also form a word. What's interesting is that the four three-letter words — the two in the original phrase, the one that was removed, and the one that remains — all rhyme. What is the original phrase?
I thought this was a lovely original idea: not as difficult as the rather wordy explanation portended ... our dog Mimi woke me up in the middle of the night so I thought I'd take a look at what was in store and had worked it out before falling back to sleep. As usual, send your answers in to NPR here.

My photo challenge this week features other (3,3) phrases where the two halves rhyme (they are in alphabetical order). Click on the picture to discover the phrase, but don't try taking these to your doctor!:



Time for...

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.

I believe the entries were announced as "about 400". Time to dust off that tie-break rule. Wait! I don't understand the small print (not for the first time). I have to check in with the lawyer in the family. Meanwhile, all I can say is that Someone has won. Congratulations Someone! Watch the comments for our verdict on this.
Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print. 

Thursday, July 12, 2012

NPR Puzzle 7/8/12 -- That Name Rings a Bell

Ross again, here to give you the answer to last Sunday's NPR Puzzle:
Think of a well-known actor, three letters in the first name, seven letters in the last. One of the letters is an "S." Change the "S" to a "K" and rearrange the result, and you'll name a well-known fictional character. Who is it?
It seemed like I ran through half a dozen "well-known" actors before getting anywhere with this: it had to be the amazing Rod Steiger ... he's well-known, right? If not him, Rod Serling, who is certainly a regular in crosswords.

What about Bob Hoskins, Sam Elliott, Tom Selleck, Tim Robbins, Sam Shepard? I was beginning to despair and start trying actresses when I landed in the right spot with the star of:



Yes, take Ben Stiller, change the S to a K and anagram the letters and you get Tinker Bell, the fairy in J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan, that through the magic of Hollywood has become a Disney icon:



Time for...
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350 -- Dave
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- KDW
451 - 500 -- Magdalen
 
501 - 550 -- David
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Ross
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800 -- skydiveboy
801 - 850 -- Marie
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 + new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")

Sunday, July 8, 2012

NPR Puzzle 7/8/12 - K Stars

Hi, this is Ross the eponymous "Englishman," blogging for Magdalen who is back at school again. Living in a college dorm, too...a level of discomfort no-one over 40 should have to put up with (though I'm told dorm is very passé now...crossword constructors please note).

On with this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of a well-known actor, three letters in the first name, seven letters in the last. One of the letters is an "S." Change the "S" to a "K" and rearrange the result, and you'll name a well-known fictional character. Who is it?
Magdalen had emailed the answer before I even heard the puzzle, but I was determined to get it myself. Doing some yard work, I managed to come up with three (3,7) actors with an S in. But no anagrams to speak of. After an hour or so, I resorted to lists of actors and it seemed like I'd tried and failed with about four more before I finally got an answer.

So I reckon this is a hard puzzle, though not in Will's "tricky" sense. Just that thinking up possible actors is tough, and then you've got to think what the substituted letter string might anagram to. Going the other way from the fictional character with a K in ... I guess some people might work that way, but that didn't seem like the most promising approach to me.

Don't forget to send your answers in to NPR here.

Here's a related photo challenge. Each picture shows a well-known (3,7) with an S (but not one of my failed actor candidates ... that might give too much away). A bit of a motley crew, but in alphabetical order. Click on the image to see who is depicted:





Time for...

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above.  If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive.  First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com.  Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post.  After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.  The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.

Did I hear that 470 slayed last week's puzz? Wow! No one got anywhere near with that. I think this week's challenge will be another tough one to call.
Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  And yes, this rule is most-likely obsolete but I just like having fine print. 

Thursday, July 5, 2012

NPR Puzzle 7/1/12 -- This Puzzle Really Slayed Us!

...Killed us? Did us in? Took us out?

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of a well-known retail store chain in two words. Remove one letter from its name. The remaining letters, in order, will spell three consecutive words that are synonyms of each other. What are they? Hint: The three words are all slang.
The answer is the elided (so one-word??) OfficeMax chain of office supply stores. (Here's the Wiki page.) But clearly Dr. Shortz intended Office Max to give us OFF, ICE, and AX as three words meaning to kill.

And before we all get huffy, consider how annoyed we'd have been if Will had told us that it was a one-word retail chain? So cut him some slack. It's just a puzzle.

Today I hand over the CrosswordManBlog (see? one word or three??) to Ross, the Crossword Man himself. I'm off to Maine for my MFA. Yes, ten days on the coast of Maine! Sheer bliss...until you realize that I'll be inside all day, at classes from 8:30 a.m. to mid-afternoon, then at readings after dinner. So for the next two weeks, I'll be a fan of the blog just like all of you. I know Ross will find some fun stuff for us.

Photos. I mentioned an Ed McBain 87th Precinct mystery--one of the really early ones--called Ice. In the novel, the title represents diamonds, murder, and something else. Maybe, even, frozen water. That was the meaning I intended when I found photos of glacial ice:








Time for...
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- Dave
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100 -- Anonymous
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 -- Magdalen
1,251 - 1,300 -- Ross
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450 -- Marie
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 -- skydiveboy
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900 -- KDW
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 + new record.
Our tie-break rule:  In the event that a single round number is announced, AND two separate people picked the ranges leading up to and leading up from that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose")