Sunday, September 30, 2012

NPR Puzzle 9/30/12 True is Not the Opposite of Mute

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of a word in which the second letter is R. Change the R to an M, and rearrange the result. You'll get the opposite of the original word. What is it? (Hint: The two words start with the same letter.)
We don't have this yet. I'll endeavor to craft a wonderful post without the answer. (Psst, hurry up, Ross!)

Of course, you didn't have any trouble solving it and you've already clicked through to the handy NPR form for submitting the answer.

Hah! I solved it before Ross did. Bragging rights ALL DAY! Oh, wait, there's a flag on the play. Ross is claiming my answer isn't the right answer. Whatever.

Ross predicts moaning and groaning from the usual suspects (we're looking at you, Mendo Jim), so remember the rules: don't hint so I notice.

Okay, photos. So what I did was look in Wiki for one of these words. Then I noodled around until I thought, "Ooh, I like [insert place name here]" for reasons I can't say. That took me to a particular person's Wiki page, and from there I scrounged some photos...that, really, have nothing to do with the puzzle except that they look pretty and I want to go there.







Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.
There were more than 1100 entries this week, which means that Henry won. Because he's very nearly family, we'll pick something out and give it to him when he next visits. (Thanksgiving?) For non-family members, we'll mail it out. Honest! Send in your favorite range and see if you can win.
Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Thursday, September 27, 2012

NPR Puzzle 9/23/12 And Now a Footnote From Our Sponsor

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name two parts of the human body. Put them together one after the other. Change the 7th letter in the result to the next letter of the alphabet to name something that's often found in books. What is it?
I should have gotten this sooner, but what can I say. I don't use footnotes in my fiction.

Anyone guess our photo section bibliophile? It was William Ewart Gladstone. He was the Victorian prime minister who would walk the streets of London seeking out prostitutes to rescue and rehabilitate. Quite unseemly behavior for a politician--the walking on the streets part, I mean--but I, for one, believe Gladstone did not actually cavort with the prostitutes he claimed to help. I'm not sure he helped them, either, but his protestations of sexual innocence ring true.

Oh, right, and he collected books.

Speaking of books, here's a great Banned Books Banner:


You can click through to the Flickr page and see if you can identify all the books. One's missing--they used the top 100 books banned between 1990 and 2000--but it wasn't a title I recognized. Seriously, some of these books are REALLY BENIGN. Wow, makes you wonder.

Time for...
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000 -- Ross
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150 -- Henry BW
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450 -- Magdalen
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- EKW
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 -- Marie
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750 -- KDW
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000 -- skydiveboy
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 + new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, September 23, 2012

NPR Puzzle 9/23/12 - Would a Bookworm Count?

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name two parts of the human body. Put them together one after the other. Change the 7th letter in the result to the next letter of the alphabet to name something that's often found in books. What is it?
Not hard for Ross, and I have a day's worth of driving yesterday to blame for my inability to focus. (Not really; I just didn't see it.)

You've seen it and have the answer ready, of course, so why not send it in to NPR using their cunning form here.

I have to admit, when I think of the expression, "something you might find in a book," I think of a reader (specifically me) although that imagery works less well with digital book readers. "Get Lost in a Book" is a famous ad campaign by the American Library Association. And who gets lost in books? Bookworms.

For our photo section, I've selected some places that feature in the biography of a famous bibliographer. You can click on all the photos to see where they were taken. Can you figure out who it is from the photos, though? (N.B. Blogger alphabetizes the photos so they're not in a chronological order for the famous bookworm's life.)







Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.
There were fewer than 1500 entries this week, which means that I came close, which counts not at all. You can do better! Send in your guess, surmise, or elaborately calculated approximation!
Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Thursday, September 20, 2012

NPR Puzzle 9/16/12 - Like a Good Neighbor Puzzle

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of something that the majority of adults buy. It's a two-word phrase with 10 letters in the first word and nine in the second. This phrase uses each of the five vowels (A, E, I, O, and U) exactly twice. What familiar product is this?
AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE

Here's the Wiki page for vehicle insurance around the world. As you can tell, I didn't get very far in Sunday's photo array showing all the places mentioned--I was able to do Australia and that was about it. So, continuing down from there... (click on each photo for more information).







Time for...
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900 -- skydiveboy
901 - 950
951 - 1,000 -- Ross
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- KDW
1,101 - 1,150 -- Henry BW
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 -- Dave
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350 -- Joe Kupe
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450 -- Magdalen
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400 -- Curtis
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750 -- EKW
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 + new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, September 16, 2012

NPR Puzzle - Old MacDonald Bought a Farm, Sort Of

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of something that the majority of adults buy. It's a two-word phrase with 10 letters in the first word and nine in the second. This phrase uses each of the five vowels (A, E, I, O, and U) exactly twice. What familiar product is this?
I thought this was absurdly easy, mostly because I solved it without the use of Ross's software. I don't normally solve the puzzles a) quickly and b) all by myself.

And, as I routinely assume you all solve the puzzle FASTER than I do, you're wondering what took me so long! Go ahead, laugh all the way to the handy NPR submission form.

We got a GIFT in the mail! The delightful EKW (his full name is Equatorial Kelvin Wave; I've read his Wiki page and I have no idea what it says) has sent us a CD of his choral group performing Brahms's German Requiem. Thank you, EKW.

No, the rest of you aren't required to send us bribes gifts. Your unspoken appreciation is quite enough, I assure you. Besides, I haven't figured out how to rig the Pick a Range, so bribing us doesn't do you much good.

Photos. Hmm.Well, the product does have its own Wiki page (like that tells you anything you couldn't have figured out) and there are place names mentioned on that Wiki page. So here are some photos you can click on; I'll do different ones on Thursday:







Time for...

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.
There were fewer than 800 entries this week, which means that KDW has won. I think we have your address as a previous winner, but if not, please email me [Magdalen *at* Crosswordman *dot* com] so I can get a puzzle book out to you. See? We do send out prizes, even when we don't get gifts!
Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Thursday, September 13, 2012

NPR Puzzle 9/912 - St. Tatarinova is the Capital of One of the Stans, Right?

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a world capital whose letters can be rearranged to spell a popular and much-advertised drug. What's the capital, and what's the drug?
The answers are TRIPOLI and LIPITOR. We know nothing about Tripoli, but we're both taking Atorvastatin, the generic name for Lipitor.

Photos: Here's the Wiki page for Atorvastatin. And here's the Wiki Page for Bruce Roth, the inventor of the drug. Luckily for me, Bruce has studied or worked at lots of universities with pretty campuses before ending up at Genentech in San Francisco. Note that I was able to get all four seasons and two times of day in the photo array:


St. Joseph's University, Philadelphia

Iowa State University (freezing fog, according to the photographer)

The Quad, University of Rochester

Ann Arbor, Michigan -- Summer Festival. This is an acrobatics troupe called "Strange Fruit" from Melbourne, Australia

San Francisco, morning

San Francisco, sunset

Time for...
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550 -- EKW
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800 -- KDW
801 - 850 -- Dave
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- Marie
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 -- skydiveboy
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450 -- Magdalen
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- Ross
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850 -- Joe Kupe
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050 -- Mendo Jim
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 + new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, September 9, 2012

NPR Puzzle 9/9/12 - Another Capital Idea!

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a world capital whose letters can be rearranged to spell a popular and much-advertised drug. What's the capital, and what's the drug?
Whatever the answer is, take two and call Will in the morning.

But first, be sure to send in the correct answer to NPR using this happy little form (I figure I need to be nice to it, lest it break again) right here.

Before I get to this week's Photo Array, let me address the comment that Mendo Jim left on Thursday's post. MJ--don't you think it's time to leave dial-up? Or, at the very least, make it a weekly ritual to stop by any of the emporia that offer Wi-Fi to their customers and upload the photos there? But if those solutions don't appeal to you, how about this. You have my email [Magdalen *at* Crosswordman *dot* com], so you write and ask for the URLs of the pretty pictures. I'll send them to you and let you click on them, or not, in your own time. Howzat?

Photos: We know the limitations to having photos of the world capital, so I won't do that. No, these photos are from the Wiki page of the individual responsible for the drug. Enjoy!






Time for...

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.
There were more than 500 entries this week, which means that EKW has won. Please email me [Magdalen *at* Crosswordman *dot* com] so I can get a puzzle book out to you. Yay! Proof that, yes, from time to time someone wins!!
Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print).