Sunday, December 30, 2012

NPR Puzzle 12/30/12 -- The Incredible Shrinking City

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
First, name a U.S. state capital. Rearrange its letters to spell the name of another American city. Remove one letter and read the result backward to spell a third American city. Finally, move the first letter of that to the end to spell a fourth American city. The cities are in four different states. What are they?
Ross solved this one while I was doing something inconsequential on the Internet. Only one aspect of the puzzle surprised him. Is that a hint? I doubt it.

And anyway, you've already solved it yourself and sent it along to NPR using their post-modernist Contact Form.

Some announcements:

First, I will be off for a couple weeks so Ross will be filling in. I'll be checking the blog and may even comment--who knows? (I have to drive to Maine this week for school. I'm enrolled in the University of Southern Maine's low residency MFA program, which is called Stonecoast.)

Second, an apology. I had meant to add captions to the photos from last Sunday's post. You've guessed that the odd double exposure (it looks a bit like a ceiling fan with a grate behind it) is of the building where the Chicago's World's Fair of 1893 was held. Rodin displayed work there. But I had failed to caption the photos when I provided the correct Flickr links, so I've gone back and done that. Clearly I'd done a better job of obfuscation than I'd realized!

Finally, I'll be making a donation to the Red Cross Sandy Relief fund for all the winners of the past few weeks. (I'm rounding up to $50.) I like the option of having a charitable donation. Starting in 2013, I'd like the contribution to go to the Fairfield County Community Foundation, established by the Taunton Press, publishers of Fine Homebuilding and Fine Woodworking magazines. Taunton Press was started by Paul Roman, an old friend of my dad's a million years ago. They'd both worked at General Electric, but Paul's first love was woodworking, so he quit to start a business making games tables and somehow that became Fine Woodworking, which ending up being a bunch of high-end hobby-related magazines. The Romans and Taunton Press are located in Newtown, Connecticut, so I want them to have our money for the next quarter. So guess wisely & well and let's help them heal that wounded community.

Photos:

Willamette University,  Salem, Oregon

Montebello, a B&B in Ames, IA

Selma, Alabama

Salem, Oregon

Curtis Hall, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

Selma, Alabama

Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.

There were around 1300 entries for last week's puzzle, and we all picked WAY too low.

You can win either a puzzle book or the warm glow of satisfaction knowing you're a generous person who caused a contribution to the Fairfield County Community Foundation. Guess the range for this week's puzzle, and good luck!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Thursday, December 27, 2012

NPR Puzzle - 12/23/12 -- The Heartbreak Kid's "Classical" Puzzle

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Take the last name of a famous actor. Drop the first letter, and you'll get the last name of a famous artist. Drop the first letter again, and you'll get the name of a god in classical mythology. What names are these?
Is so well-understood that "classical" mythology is only Roman and Greek mythology, with the possible inclusion of pre-Ptolemic Egyptian mythology thrown in for good measure? If so, then Mendo Jim is right and Dr. Will Shortz is wrong. Because the god in question is ODIN from the Northern European pantheon. The actor is Charles GRODIN and the artist is French sculptor Auguste RODIN.

I hope everyone had a wonderful Tuesday, whether it was a sacred or commercial holiday, or no holiday at all.

Oh, and Paul pointed out that one of the humans won an award in one of the places I had photos. Did you mean, Paul, Rodin won an award at the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago? Or the award that Charles Grodin won in Valladolid?

Now that all can be revealed, here are some new & different photos:

Charles Grodin

This building was used for Charles Grodin's character's office in Dave

The Rodin Museum in Philadelphia (love this building)

Le Penseur II in Paris

The Flickr page suggests this is an adaptation of Odin, Anthony Hopkins' character in the movie Thor

It sounds like a joke, but Odin, Hone & Lodur walk into a wood. They find two trees without spirits, so they jazz them up. This is Ask (ash).
Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200 -- Ross
201 - 250 -- Marie
251 - 300 -- Joe Kupe
301 - 350 -- skydiveboy
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- KDW
451 - 500 -- Magdalen
 
501 - 550 -- Laura
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750 -- Paul
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- Dave
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, December 23, 2012

NPR Puzzle 12/23/12 I'm guessing it's not Bob Ross

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Take the last name of a famous actor. Drop the first letter, and you'll get the last name of a famous artist. Drop the first letter again, and you'll get the name of a god in classical mythology. What names are these?
It was a team effort to solve this, as we have Henry visiting this weekend. Actually, Henry didn't help but I'm sure just having him in the room made all the difference.

Who helped you solve it? Whoever it is, think kindly of them when you fill out the NPR contact form and claim all the credit for yourself.

Here are some photos of places mentioned in one or other of the Wiki pages for our famous actor, famous artist and/or famous god. You can even click through now to see what each photo's of because I was pretty crafty in obfuscation:

Valladolid, Spain, where Charles Grodin won an acting award in 1988

Exhibition Hall of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair

Victoria Tower's Gardens, where one of Rodin's sculptures is located

This castle is in Hesse, which has some significance to scholars of Norse-Germanic mythology

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania--birthplace of Charles Grodin

Cordoba, Spain -- Yes, I know this looks Moorish, but there's actually an established religion in Spain, Asatru, that worships Odin. Who knew?

If you want to pair up photos with Artist, Actor, and God in the comments, feel free. I'll let you know if you got it right in the Thursday post.

Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.

There were around 570 entries for last week's puzzle. No winner this week. (I'm still waiting for Jan to get in touch from winning last week.)

 You can win either a puzzle book or the warm glow of satisfaction knowing you're a generous person who caused a contribution to the Red Cross's fund for Superstorm Sandy victims. (In the new year, we may offer a new charity as the substitute gift.) Guess the range for this week's puzzle, and good luck!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Thursday, December 20, 2012

NPR Puzzle 12/16/12 -- He Knows When You've Been Naughty

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a two-word geographical location. Remove the first letter. Move one of the other letters to the front of what's left. This will result in a single word. And this word names what you are most likely looking through when you see that geographical location. What is it?
The intended answer, I believe, is NORTH POLE and PORTHOLE. So, unless you're being pulled by eight reindeer, you're looking at the North Pole through a porthole in an airplane. Which I think of as a window.

Oh, well, never mind.

Commenter Paul mentioned that if you anagram  PORTHOLE you get two things from my book (did you miss the plug for my book, Love in Reality?): HERO & PLOT.  Well done, Paul. I'll happily name a character after you!

We were naughty recently. We used a Flickr photo taken by a fellow who calls himself Sir Henry. He merely pointed out that we should have asked him before we used the photo. We took it down immediately, but in my response, I explained that his photo was identified as being governed by Creative Commons license, that specified simply that it couldn't be used by a commercial site. Which this isn't.

Sir Henry replied that it wouldn't have been hard to ask him. And I replied:
I appreciate your position, but we do two blog posts a week, with six photos each time. We make sure the photos all click through to the Flickr page. If I had to write to six people every Sunday and Thursday, wait for their replies, and choose photos on the basis of whether the photographer agreed, I simply would never blog.

Much easier to post only Creative Commons photos. If the photographer complains (which has happened twice in four years), we just remove the photo. Vastly easier.
His reply was this photo, which he has kindly allowed us to use:

Presented with permission of the photographer
I happily echo Sir Henry's sentiment.

Also in our mailbag this week was this photo:

Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory; The North Pole Environmental Observatory; http://psc.apl.washington.edu/northpole
That seems to be all the identification and credit I'm requested to use. Many thanks to frequent commenter EKW for going to a LOT of trouble to get me permission to use this photograph of the actual North Pole.

All the photos from Sunday were of "North" or "Pole." You can click them now to see what they're of, who they're by, and so forth.

And I think I'll leave it at that for the Photo section this time. No point pushing my luck!

Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Ross
401 - 450 -- Joe Kupe
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750 -- Dave
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150 -- Barbara
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300 -- skydiveboy
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Magdalen
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800 -- KDW
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000 -- Marie
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400 -- Curtis
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750 -- Paul
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250 -- Laura
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record -- EKW
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, December 16, 2012

NPR Puzzle 12/16/12 - Looking Through Rose-Colored Glasses?

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a two-word geographical location. Remove the first letter. Move one of the other letters to the front of what's left. This will result in a single word. And this word names what you are most likely looking through when you see that geographical location. What is it?
This is one of the puzzles that can, conceivably, be solved backwards.
Start with something you look through, remove the first letter and place it elsewhere in the word, add a new letter to the beginning of the letter string, split that into two and you get a geographical location.
Ross got it, although we're doubtful about the "most likely" part. Kinda depends on...well, we'll talk about that on Thursday, shall we?

And when you have it, as I'm sure you do, you can send it along to NPR using this form here.

In other, completely tacky bit of self-promotion, my book is out:


Here's the blurb:
TV producer Rand Jennings solves the problem of his boss-from-hell, Marcy, when he sees a way to mess with Marcy’s reality TV show, The Fishbowl. It’ll drive her crazy if he selects genuinely talented “Fish” who’ll treat the game as more than trash-talking in skimpy swimwear. At the end of the season, Rand will have written a winning screenplay he’ll pitch as “The Devil Wears Prada gets Gaslighted.”

He casts his first ringer, a confident bartender from South Philadelphia, not realizing that Lissa-the-bartender is actually her twin, Libby-the-law-student. When Libby’s summer law job evaporates in the bad economy, and a certain cute producer kisses her, she agrees to spend the summer locked in a stage set decorated like a fish tank.

As their relationship deepens despite the show, Libby’s lies and Rand’s deceptions threaten any chance they have to be a real couple. Set against the humorous backdrop of a tasteless reality TV show, Love in Reality is the sexy story of how falling in love forces Rand and Libby to be honest with themselves and each other. 
Clearly it has nothing to do with this blog, so no one has to buy it. If you're interested, though, there are "read now" buttons at the Harmony Road Press website. And it costs nothing to download a sample, just to see if I can write.

Photos for this week's challenge. Interesting. (If you've solved it, you know why I say "Interesting" while stroking my chin.)








For what it's worth, none of these photos is near or of the geographical location in the puzzle. Enjoy!

Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.

There were over 2,800 entries for last week's puzzle, and Jan won--with the last pick registered. In fact, her pick came in so late, I'd already written Thursday's post and scheduled it for publication. But that's still legal. So, Jan, you may have a puzzle book or a donation to the Red Cross. Your choice. Contact me at Magdalen >at< CrosswordMan.com and let me know your preference and, if needed, your mailing address.

You--yes, you!--can win either a puzzle book or the warm glow of satisfaction knowing you're a generous person who caused a contribution to the Red Cross's fund for Superstorm Sandy victims. Guess the range for this week's puzzle, and good luck!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Thursday, December 13, 2012

NPR Puzzle 12/19/12 - Flaky, Flabby & Flawed

Here's this week's puzzle:
Name a major US city in two words. Take the first letter of the first word and the first two letters of the second word. Read together, they spell the standard three letter abbreviation of the state the city is in. What city is it?
The answer...oh, why bother? Here it is:


(And may I register my protest about these asinine snowflakes? Some have four sides, some five (!), and the ones that have six look like asterisks.) Plus, how often does it snow in Fort Lauderdale, for crissake?)

All the pictures in Sunday's post were, of course, of Fort Lauderdale. Scroll down and click for more information about any of them.

For today's photos, let's go to the other extreme and look at snowy places. So far, all we've gotten is frost here. It's pretty, but snow is prettier. Until there's too much of it, and then it isn't. As usual, you can click through to the original Flickr post to see more about these pretty pictures.







Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000 -- Barbara
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350 -- Dave
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500 -- Ross

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800 -- KDW
1,801 - 1,850 -- skydiveboy
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950 -- Paul
1,951 - 2,000 -- Marie
2,001 - 2,050 -- Joe Kupe
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250 -- Magdalen
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400 -- Curtis
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750 -- EKW
2,751 - 3,000 -- Jan
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, December 9, 2012

NPR Puzzle 12/9/12 - We're Open For Hints! (It's that Easy)

Here's this week's puzzle:
Name a major US city in two words. Take the first letter of the first word and the first two letters of the second word. Read together, they spell the standard three letter abbreviation of the state the city is in. What city is it?
So easy that I'd solved it even as I was typing it in. (I hope I got the wording right, Will--it wasn't up on the website for me to cut & paste.)

So easy that you don't even need the hyperlink to the NPR Contact Us form (but I'm contractually obligated to provide it, so here it is.)

So easy that I'm tempted to put up pretty pictures of the city even though certain aspects of the city would BE HINTS. Eh, screw it. Let's live on the edge. I'll avoid the ones with specific signage, shall I?








Oh, and our usual prohibition on hinting too obviously in the comments? Phht. Have at it. Most creative/funny/ironic/sarcastic hint wins!


Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.

There were over 1,500 entries for last week's puzzle, and no one won last week. C'mon, people: Mama needs to make a new donation to the Red Cross (or to send out a puzzle book; your choice).

You can win either a puzzle book or the warm glow of satisfaction knowing you're a generous person who caused a contribution to the Red Cross's fund for Superstorm Sandy victims. Guess the range for this week's puzzle, and good luck!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print).