Thursday, January 17, 2013

NPR Puzzle - 1/13/13 - You Wanted Feedback?

We think the answer to last Sunday's NPR puzzle:
Think of two familiar, unhyphenated, eight-letter words that contain the letters A, B, C, D, E and F, plus two others, in any order. What words are these?
is boldface and feedback.

I have to say that mention of unhyphenated led me to hope that the answers weren't compound words ... which would have been something more special. But the intended answers (we think) are listed as single words in the latest editions of most dictionaries, and importantly Merriam-Webster.

If your dictionary gives either of these answers as two-word, or hyphenated, the chances are you have an old edition ... or the lexicographers are unwise to contemporary usage and/or not very hip and trendy.

Some commenters had a problem with one of the "two others" in feedback needing to be taken from A thru F again. I have to say that doesn't bother me, and I wouldn't even have noticed if it hadn't been pointed out. I guess "two others" could be read to be two other letters in general, or two letters other than the aforementioned.

When I looked up feedback in Flickr last Sunday, I found lots of wonderful examples of photographic feedback, but couldn't show most of them until now ... it might have given the game away. Here then is my pick of the feedback examples on Flickr:


Oh, and if you think this NPR puzzle is rather similar to another recent one, then you'd be right ... and might enjoy the following:
And with that, I'll bid you all adieu till the next time. Magdalen takes over again on Sunday.

Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500 -- EKW
 
501 - 550 -- skydiveboy
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Ross
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- Magdalen
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- KDW
951 - 1,000 -- Joe Kupe
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150 -- Dave
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350 -- zeke creek
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- Paul
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950 -- Margaret
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400 -- Curtis
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750 -- Laura
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

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