Thursday, January 3, 2013

NPR Puzzle - 12/30/12 -- Change of State

A very happy new year to you all! 2013 has every digit different, and that's not happened for a very long time. Does it bring good luck? If so, we're in for seven years of it.

In case you haven't already guessed, it's Crossword Man here, bringing you his musings on last Sunday's NPR puzzle:
First, name a U.S. state capital. Rearrange its letters to spell the name of another American city. Remove one letter and read the result backward to spell a third American city. Finally, move the first letter of that to the end to spell a fourth American city. The cities are in four different states. What are they?
Not too difficult, with the state capitals being a relatively small set to choose from. I foolishly started with the seven-letter ones, then went progressively shorter. If I'd started with the three equal shortest (at five letters), I'd have got to the right answer faster.

Here then, are the cities, with some useful trivia to boot:
Salem, the state capital of Oregon,
is nicknamed the "Cherry City," for it was a big grower of cherries back in the day

Selma features in several states, but the one in Alabama
is well known because of the Selma to Montgomery marches

Ames, the eighth-largest city in Iowa,
is the birthplace of the Atanasoff-Berry Computer, the world's first electronic digital computer

Mesa, a city in Arizona,
has 320 days of sunshine every year (and I want to go there)
Here are some new pix from the places:

Capitol Beaver Family, Salem, OR
Selma to Montgomery March
Atanasoff-Berry Computer, Ames, IA
Baby Gila Woodpecker, Mesa, AZ

Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- Ross
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- Joe Kupe
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- Dave
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry
1,101 - 1,150 -- zeke creek
1,151 - 1,200 -- Paul
1,201 - 1,250 -- skydiveboy
1,251 - 1,300 -- Anonymous
1,301 - 1,350 -- Mendo Jim
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450 -- Magdalen
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- David
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000 -- Marie
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750 -- KDW
2,751 - 3,000 -- Laura
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

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