Sunday, February 10, 2013

NPR Puzzle 2/10/13 - Presidential Bee & Wannabee

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Take the last name of a former president of a foreign country, someone well-known. Change the last letter of this name to an O and rearrange the result. You'll get the last name of someone who wanted to be president of the United States. Who are these two people?
Ross solved this one, and I'll be honest: I wasn't watching while he did it, so who knows what sorts of lists or sites he consulted. I just know I have two whole Wiki pages to consult for photos! (It's the simple things that make me happy.)

I hope you're happy with your answer, which you've sent in to NPR through their contact page, found here.

Speaking of answers, more power to Mendo Jim for getting the highly obscure REX STOUT and TO: BUSTER alterno-answer. I don't think Will Shortz would have mentioned it without the proof that someone called Archie "Buster" throughout a specific book.

Time for photos and a disclaimer. I don't normally post photos with people in them, but the man at the podium below is a public figure. That's U.S. Navy Admiral Mike Mullen, then the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He is not related to either man in today's puzzle--it's the podium (and its location) that is relevant.








Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.

There were about 850 entries for last week's BEATRIX POTTER / REX STOUT puzzle. Amazingly, that was the one range no one picked. Our current choice of prizes--a puzzle book or a contribution to the Fairfield County Community Foundation--is still up for grabs. Make a guess for the chance to win either a puzzle book or the warm glow of satisfaction knowing you're a generous person. We want you to win!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

12 comments:

Laura said...

I'm going with 451 - 500

Paul said...

1651 - 1700 FCCF

KDW said...

A follow-up to last week's puzzle's alternate answer: I don't think of Archie Goodwin as Rex Stout's "most famous character"--that designation should go to Nero Wolfe. Still, coming up with that answer was brilliant!

I'll try the 851-900 range this week, please.

David said...

1001 to 1050.

I'm sick and my brain isn't working, so I don't have the answer yet.

skydiveboy said...

507

Joe Kupe said...

2501 - 2750 please. Maybe it's just me, but with less than five minutes of research I realized the answer.

EKW said...

951-1000

zeke creek said...

901- 950, please.

Mendo Jim said...

I never intended "To: Buster" as a serious entry. Wolfe is obviously Stout's most famous character and in the story Will refers to Archie is Buster.

This week's challenge is not very challenging.
It is one of those that come to you as soon as you set the parameters in your head, e.g. what countries have presidents and not prime ministers (or emirs) and how far back does the P Master expect us to remember defeated candidates.
So what I am assuming is the intended answer took about five minutes to figure out.

With the number of countries out there and the number of failed hopefuls here over the years (maybe 150 including third party candidates), I'll bet someone comes up with an alternative, depending how flexible "well known" is.

800 to 850 seems reasonable.

Dave said...

Who let the cat out of the bag? I'm going with 1051 to 1100

curtisjohnsonimages said...

I'll go with 1,351 - 1,400 this week. I'm pretty sure the answer doe not involve Sylvestre Ntibantunganya

Marie said...

To me this is pretty easy, but that's what I said last week, cutting back to 1101.