Sunday, May 5, 2013

NPR Puzzle 5/5/13 -- Performer Chopped in Half? Sounds Like a Magic Act

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a famous performer whose last name has six letters. Move the first three letters to the end — without otherwise changing the order of the letters — and add one more letter at the end. The result, in seven letters, will name a place where this person famously performed. Who is it, and what's the place?
The hardest part of solving this was figuring out how to solve it. But we managed. We're rusty, but we're not completely brain-dead.

You, of course, do not have our problems with squeaky synapses that need to be greased. You've already sent the correct answer in to NPR using their contact form found here.

Today is Cinco de Mayo, which also happens to be Ross's and my "American" anniversary. For immigration reasons, we needed to get married pretty quickly after my divorce to Henry was final, so we accepted our cousin's kind invitation to have a simple ceremony on her deck in Lexington, MA. Jeans and sneakers, plus the town clerk as justice of the peace. Almost a year later we did the "big dress" ceremony at Fountain's Abbey in North Yorkshire. Yup, we've been married twice, just to satisfy legal concerns and to make sure Ross's nieces could be bridesmaids.

Photos: Here are some pictures of places mentioned in our famous performer's Wiki entry.







Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution to The One Fund Boston in the winner's honor.

I'm in the camp that thinks last week's puzzle lacked a certain charm. This week? Better. Incidentally, Ross "won" last week with 550, which seems a low number of entries for a puzzle solvable by the 79-year-old winner in 5 minutes using Google. Factor all that in and let us know your pick for the chance to win either a puzzle book or the warm glow of satisfaction you get because you're a generous person.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

6 comments:

Word Woman said...

Is your hubby tired of people asking "Oh, when did you Marry Magdalen?"

Congrats!

451-500 please.

David said...

I got the answer just before halfway in this mornings run, but it took only about 5 minutes of total thinking. I'm not sure the puzzle is as easy as Will thinks, but I'll stick with my 1001 to 1050.

curtisjohnsonimages said...

I'm gonna guess low, 351 - 400, because this performer is no longer a household name in this country, no is the venue.

Mendo Jim said...

I wish I could remember if I got this one more or less easliy the last time Will used it. Couldn't have been too much easier, actually.
It wasn't that long ago and the wording was different.
700 folks got it that time, so I'll go there.
The on-air lady was great.

zeke creek said...

501-550 please. Welcome back.

Marie said...

551 please. It's sad that there aren't more entries.