Thursday, June 20, 2013

...And Sometimes Y, But Not This Time

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:

Write down these five words: "mate," "peck," "miss," "pot" and "blunder." There is something very unusual they have in common. What is it? And, can you name one other word with the same property?
All five words--you'll notice how they different vowels in the beginning of the word?--can take all five vowels in that position. MATE, METE, MITE, MOTE, MUTE, etc.

We've thought of one, BALL, BELL, BILL, BOLL, BULL, but we know there must be lots. Yup, there's one: LAST, LEST, LIST, LOST, LUST. (I got that from typing LOTS, by the way.)

Anyway, I used photos on Sunday that I got from looking up ball, etc. on Flickr. Let's see what I get with last, etc.

Last

Last

Lest

List

Lost

Lust
Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200 -- Laura
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350 -- Magdalen
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- Marie
451 - 500 -- Ross
 
501 - 550 -- David
551 - 600 -- Word Woman
601 - 650
651 - 700 -- skydiveboy
701 - 750
751 - 800 
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

2 comments:

Mendo Jim said...

Turns out I flopped on a pretty good challenge.
It is a little surprising since I have played a similar game for many years, except phonetically instead of with English's funky spelling.
The results of this endeavor are in the form: mate, mat, met, mete, mite, mitt, mote, mutt, mute, etc. (even Mott as in Hoople) or dame, dam, deem, dim, dime, dome, dumb, doom, etc.
Among many other forms is: mace, made, Meg, mail, maim, main, mayor, mate. etc.
The principal benefit of these efforts is to find spaces not already used and that could be filled if necessary: e.g. mape or dem.
Needs no pen and paper, only a time with no ohter claims on your brain.

Word Woman said...

Mendo Jim, me, too! Great long car trip games with the kids...I think you can guess even without solving, yes ;-)?

Laura, we have missed you over at Blaine's!