Thursday, June 27, 2013

I Deduce Ether Trashes Height

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Write down these five words: "aide," "heart," "tough," "gelatin" and "emanate." There is something very unusual they have in common. What is it? And what's another word with this property?
The answer is that each word can be rearranged into another word simply by moving the first letter to the end. AIDE becomes IDEA, etc.

The second part of the puzzle--coming up with a new word that shares this property--is super easy if you don't specify a minimum length. "Easy" could have been "Yeas" (as in, "The yeas have it."). Ross and I tried to find longer words. RANCHO / ANCHOR, GRIFFIN / RIFFING, etc. We got a bit cheeky when Ross suggested DUNSTABLE / UNSTABLED.

If you want to see an entire list of words (and some names, like Dunstable) that fit this pattern, try this: http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Rec/rec.puzzles/2005-08/msg00017.html

As you might have guessed, our photos on Sunday were of places with RANCHO, GRIFFIN, AND DUNSTABLE in their Flickr descriptions. (I threw in a DHURRIE rug, but I'll admit that I got that from the list.)

Dunstable Priory

Pisa, Italy -- note the griffin on the tiny plinth on the right

Dunstable Downs

Rancho Luna Beach, Cienfuegos, Cuba

A dhurrie rug being woven

Rancho Milpitas, near Napa Valley
Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500 -- Ross
 
501 - 550 -- David
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Magdalen
651 - 700 -- Mendo Jim
701 - 750 -- Word Woman
751 - 800 -- Curtis
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- Joe Kupe
951 - 1,000 -- Marie
1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300 -- skydiveboy
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

4 comments:

Paul said...

On the air last Sunday, Will used the phrase 'tranquil sea creature'. Did that just emanate from his subconscious? And please don't get mad at me for pointing out that photo #7 depicts a RANGE.

I'm really hoping no news is good news, medically speaking.

Word Woman said...

I hope you were not to hurried on (while sitting on your dhurrie rug) to report on your health, Magdalen. Or maybe, hopefully, everything is just hunky dhurrie. ;-)

Mendo Jim said...

Another property these words have in common is that they are made up of discrete (Scrabble® approved) shorter words: ai, de, he, art, to, ugh, etc.
Maybe not what Dr. S had in mind, but hard to discount.
One of the anti-robotic code words I got is "Mehitable." I had only heard of "mehitabel," uncapitalized, of course.

Anonymous said...

Sunday morning is a great time for swordplay!