Thursday, August 29, 2013

NPR Puzzle 8/25/13 - Working at the Car Wash, Yeah

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Think of a business that's found in most towns. Its name consists of two words, each starting with a consonant. Interchange the consonants and you'll get two new words — neither of which rhymes with the original words. What business is it?
The answer is CAR WASH. War Cash doesn't rhyme...or make much sense.

This reminds me of the day my head exploded. Henry and I used to get the actual Saturday edition of the Times of London to do The Listener (hardest crossword in the English language, yadda yadda). Saturday's puzzle page in The Times is massive--pages, actually. On day Philip Howard, a Times editor who dabbled in word puzzles, posed this one: What three letter word rhymes with the three-letter word created when you reverse the letters? (In other words, ABC rhymes with CBA.)

The answer--according to an authority no less than The Times of London--is WAR, which rhymes with RAW. Has your head exploded yet? Find a Brit and ask him or her to say the two words. They rhyme in an English accent. (I have no idea if CAR and WAR rhyme in an English accent. I suspect not.)

For Sunday's photos, I rejected "car" as a search word in Flickr. "Wash" yielded photos 1, 2, and 3 (water dripping from a washing line); 4 is an actual car wash; 5 & 6 are of Westlake Village, and Westlake Theatre, respectively. The movie Car Wash was filmed in the Westlake area of Los Angeles.



Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- skydiveboy
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550 -- zeke creek
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- Ross
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- Magdalen
951 - 1,000 -- EKW
1,001 - 1,050 -- Word Woman
1,051 - 1,100 -- Marie
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 -- David
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- Joe Kupe
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

7 comments:

Ross Beresford said...

Another $20 has just gone to One Fund Boston in honor of Pick A Range wins by Joe Kupe (Aug 18) and David (Aug 11). Did I miss one? If so, let me know.

curtisjohnsonimages said...

Sometimes I don't know why I bother to play the puzzler. After more than 15 years of playing the puzzle, I apparently got the call today, but missed it because my phone way away from my body on the charger.

Word Woman said...

I dearly hope we do not get involved in a "raw war" in Syria. Brits were savvy enough to say no.

skydiveboy said...

Well I just cannot understand why you would even worry about such a thing when we have a Nobel Peace Prize winning president who would not dream of harming a flea. I just so miss Margaret Thatcher and her minion, Ronald Reagan, who knew all unto themselves when it was right to slaughter and murder people they felt stood in their way. Why can't we have more ruthless leaders like that now?

Henry BW said...

"War" and "raw" rhyme only in certain southern English accents (I can do it if I'm careful.) that swallow their R's. No way will it work with a Scots accent, for example. Crossword setters using phonetic clues have to be very careful to use an indicator such as "some say" to avoid half their solvers screaming at them. And no way does "car" rhyme with "war". The A's are totally different: CAH(R) and WAUGH(R).

Mendo Jim said...

First day in England, 1994, first visit to a pub.
Guys were working on a cryptic crossword, consulting the most well-used dictionary I'd ever seen.
I asked if that wasn't cheating and got back the reply: "Sowwt ah,"
(sort of).
Then the explanation that the prizes were nice pens, which I think means it was the Telegraph.
Ross?

Ross Beresford said...

That wouldn't have been me in the pub. But I recognize the scene. All that effort for a pen that probably didn't work anyway...