Thursday, September 12, 2013

Et Tu, Marc Antony? (Brutus's name doesn't work for this one)

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Name a famous person in history with four letters in the first name and six letters in the last. Move the first letter of all this to the end. The result will be a two-word phrase that might be defined as "the opposite of a curve." Who's the famous person, and what's the phrase?
We'd put Henry to work last weekend, taking apart the doors to the "Trash Mahal"--a mini-shed that holds our trash bins. Because the shed is near the front of the house, it has to look nice, so our landscape architects made sure it matched the house. That meant pale gray siding, white trim and black doors. Only the guy ("Bugsy") who painted the doors didn't exactly supply them with the coverage they needed for exposure to the elements, so they needed repainting.

Yes, we can do this stuff ourselves. We just don't want to. Enter Henry, who's a really good sport about this stuff, perhaps because at the end of the weekend, he leaves it all behind.

Anyway, he went off on Sunday morning to start reassembling the doors, and when he came in for a spot of tea (as crossword puzzles would have you believe Brits call it), he had solved the puzzle.

MARC ANTONY = ARC ANTONY[M]

When you're all done rolling your eyes, groaning, or grinning, I'll say that I think this one was pretty hard. Still don't know how Henry got it.

Our neighbors' plane was found on Sunday. It had crashed a couple miles south of the airstrip. Presumably something went horribly wrong during their approach. They've been identified. RIP, Tom and Elaine. All very, very sad.

Sunday's photos were all of two place names I found in the Wiki article on Marc Antony: Alexandria and Media. The last two are of Alexandria--the grey wall with all the cubbies is actually the Alexandria Library in Egypt; the leafy brick & ivy photo is of Alexandria, VA. The other four are Medias (funny: media is already a plural): two modern buildings in Germany, a new footbridge in Media City, and an antique car show in Media, Pennsylvania. (Home of my dentist, you'll be happy to know.)

Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100 -- Joe Kupe
101 - 150 -- Laura
151 - 200 -- skydiveboy
201 - 250 -- Word Woman
251 - 300 -- EKW
301 - 350 -- KDW
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- zeke creek
451 - 500 -- Magdalen
 
501 - 550 -- David
551 - 600 -- Ross
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800 -- Alex B.
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000 -- Marie
1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750 -- Mendo Jim
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

14 comments:

curtisjohnsonimages said...

Hmmm, my comment didn't get registered apparently.

Ross Beresford said...

Sorry about that Curtis. Should be fixed now E&OE

Magdalen said...

Well, someone is winning the Pick a Range this week, that's for sure!

Word Woman said...

Yes, it is a Full Range of Possibilities this week!

Word Woman said...

Mendo Jim, 2700 ? No way, no how.

skydiveboy said...

Yes, Word Woman, and Mendo Jim is equally wrong about the puzzle this week, and you know I am not a strong supporter of Will Shortz, but he got it exactly right this time. Calling Marc Antony Mark makes no sense at all and is just plain wrong. All in all, this was a wonderful puzzle and the best we have had in years.

Dave Taylor said...

FYI: When you click on Magdalen's Marc Anthony link to Wikipedia, it redirects to Mark Anthony....

skydiveboy said...

Dave: I know that, but it does not change the fact that Mark is not correct. Marc is short for Marcus and Mark is a stand alone name.

Mendo Jim said...

When I suggested to Magdalen and CWM that a sort of contest could be built on guesses about the announced entry count, I never imagined that a participant would be castigated for the range (or tranche as it once was) he or she submitted.

I am glad to see that SDB has some new, mellower meds, but I stand by my original comment.
The most famous Marcus Antony, the character in Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar," was Mark Antony.
As Dave points out, the Wikipedia article that Magdalen cites in her comments ("Marc Antony") never uses the name "Marc."
Other online references and all my old dictionaries overwhelmingly use "Mark."
I'd guess that Cleo, Brutus and Julius never used either nickname, but we'll never know.

So, as I said, it was a clever challenge flawed in a typical Shortzian way.

skydiveboy said...

Well Mendo Jim, as one who is named Mark I think I am far more qualified to know about Mark vs. Marc than you or Wikipedia, as if Wikipedia is an authority on anything. But, from past experience, I know you will go on and on insisting you are right about anything, no matter how obviously wrong, such as this.

skydiveboy said...

Marc (given name)


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Jump to: navigation, search


Name

Gender:
Male

Origin:
Latin

Meaning:
Marcus Romano

Marc is a European forename (typically French and Catalan), an abbreviation of the Roman name Marcus (name). This version, originally the Latin form, is spelled in the Latin manner, using a 'c'.

Magdalen said...

We like a lively discussion here, but there's such a thing as going to far. Don't make me stop this blog, boys!

I, personally, was okay with Marc Antony. I also was okay with Mendo Jim picking any number he likes.

Settled? Behave and everyone gets ice cream.

Mendo Jim said...

Sometimes Will mentions the author of a challenge.
I wonder if he could have made an attribution this time.
Maybe he will add it next week.

zeke creek said...

woohoo winner winner chicken dinner.