Thursday, September 5, 2013

To Beyoncé and Beyond! (Also: Mr. T in MS)

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Think of a well-known celebrity who goes by a single name — the last two letters of which are alphabetically separated by only one letter (like A and C, or B and D). Replace this pair of letters with the one that separates them, and you'll have a common, everyday word. What is it?
Ross got this immediately by thinking of a one-named star and getting Beyoncé. Henry got it because I gather she was performing in a concert in the Philadelphia area so, as he put it, "I only had to listen to the traffic report."

I didn't get it because I'd looked up a list of single-name stars and lo! no Beyoncé on the list. Instead, they had Mr. T, where the puzzle almost works if you accept "ms" as a word--either Ms. or short for manuscript. Of course no one rational would accept that, but it's a fun thought.

Did anyone get the significance of the photos? No? Well, Beyoncé and Jay-Z (whose real name is Jay Carter) have had a baby girl, named Blue Ivy Carter. Read from top to bottom, the photos are: Blue, Ivy, Carter, Blue, Ivy, Carter.

Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600 -- Mendo Jim
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750 -- zeke creek
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- David
951 - 1,000 -- Magdalen
1,001 - 1,050 -- Word Woman
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry
1,101 - 1,150 -- Marie
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 -- skydiveboy
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000 -- Ross
2,001 - 2,050 -- Joe Kupe
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

1 comment:

Word Woman said...

Your second photo looks like a lilly to me...No, I missed your clever sequence of photos. ..