Thursday, October 10, 2013

Shattering Glasses

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
What familiar saying in seven words has seven consonants in a rows? (Could also be expressed in nine words.)
The answer is PEOPLE [WHO LIVE] IN GLASS HOUSES SHOULDN'T THROW STONES.

As I mentioned on Sunday, we disagreed how to solve this. My approach was to use TEA, Ross's wunderbar software. Ross had tried that, but hadn't found the phrase in question, so he was going to look through a list of adages. I won, mostly because I asked TEA for a list of words that ended in four consonants, not counting Y.

If you count Y as a consonant, you get IF AT FIRST YOU DON'T SUCCEED, TRY TRY TRY AGAIN. Ten faux consonants in a row.

Glass. Well, I'm old so I thought of Philip Glass and not his younger, hipper cousin Ira. All of Sunday's photos are of places mentioned in Philip Glass's Wiki page.

Here are some glass houses, starting with the most famous Glass House, Philip Johnson's in New Canaan, Connecticut:







Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100 -- KDW
101 - 150 -- Ross
151 - 200 -- Joe Kupe
201 - 250 -- zeke creek
251 - 300 -- Word Woman
301 - 350 -- Paul
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- meaghn
451 - 500 -- Marie
 
501 - 550 -- David
551 - 600 -- Maggie Strasser
601 - 650 -- Magdalen
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

5 comments:

Word Woman said...

The pool looks amazing! Always enjoy your photograph selections. No idea who TEA is, other than something I'm drinking right now. . .

Word Woman said...

* what, not who. . .

Magdalen said...

TEA stands for The Electronic Alveary, the name Ross gave his program to help crossword solvers. Here's the link: http://crosswordman.com/tea.html

Anonymous said...

My answer was different. I realized that every time I got into the car, NPR was asking for money. So "faLL NPR PLedge drive" came to mind. Making that fit into seven or nine words was a bit of a stretch, though I did come up with "I hate the fall NPR pledge drive" and "All regular listeners hate the fall NPR pledge drive." My alternate answer involved "autumn NPR pledge drive" and was thus no better.

Phil

Word Woman said...

Thanks for the link, Magdalen. Interesting stuff ...but too mystery-removing for me.

This new city puzzle seems right up the alley for Ross and you. Happy constructing!