Sunday, November 17, 2013

Don't Make Me Stop This Car!

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Think of a word meaning "quarrel" in which several of the letters appear more than once. Remove exactly two occurrences of every repeated letter, and the remaining letters can be rearranged to spell a new word meaning "quarrel." What are the two words?
This took some work, even with all the resource books and software we have. But it can be done.

This will be another short post. Not to worry. If there's reason to worry, we will be sure to let everyone know.
Here are some photos of quarrels. Enjoy! (All are safe to click through--no hints, and they're funny --especially the first one.)








Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution in the winner's honor to the Philippine Red Cross, or World Food Programme, both helping communities hit by Haiyan (aka Super Typhoon Yolanda).

Over 700 entries, so no one won, which surprised me. This week seems harder. Still, pick a range and see if you get it right.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

12 comments:

curtisjohnsonimages said...

I'll go with 701 - 750 this week. The hardest part of this week's puzzle is to read the description carefully; therein lies the rub.

Mendo Jim said...

The first word is a little bit off in my lexicon, but overall a pretty good challenge.

Does anyone have a review of the other NPR show, "Ask Me Another" that Will mentioned?

The number in the robot check below is 560, so I'll take that.

Marie said...

Yes, I agree. I'll try 651.

zeke creek said...

201-250, please.

Word Woman said...

301-350 please.

Mendo Jim said...

Yesterday's comment attempt was on, then off.
Is the new NPR show Will mentioned any good?
The robot number below is 785, so I'll take that.

David said...

I still don't have the answer, so I'll take 501 to 550, please.

Natasha said...

I select 1001-1050 please.

KDW said...

May I have 251-300, please?

Joe Kupe said...

401 to 450 please. Tough one, hence why I collaborate with friends. Plus, did everyone see NPR cleaned up their page a bit!

Dave Taylor said...

@Mendo Jim:

I have downloaded and enjoyed several podcasts of "Ask me another" its funnier than PHC (IMHO) but not quite as good as WWDTM. The puzzles are akin to Will's on-air contestant challenges and there are many more per hour !

I find Ophira Eisenberg's over pronunciation of final consonants a bit annoying though...

Paul said...

Oh, alright, I'll play your infernal game!
451 - 500, please.